FEATURED EBOOK

An evocative portrait of a man who lived a lifetime at the track

At seventy-seven, James “Sunny Jim” Fitzsimmons should have been considering retirement. His six-decade career stretched back to 1885, when, as an eleven year-old, he began working as a stable boy. After failing as a jockey, Fitzsimmons—or Mr. Fitz to those in the know—started training horses, eventually winning three Kentucky Derbys, two Triple Crowns, and more than two thousand races. But by 1951, glory seemed to be behind him. His wife’s sudden death took the light from his eyes, and retirement loomed. And then he met Nashua.

She was the kind of horse trainers dream of. Big, powerful, with a windpipe that could suck down enough air to keep her running for weeks. Mr. Fitz knew he had a winner. It was only a matter of time before he realized that he had also just met the most remarkable horse of his long, storied career.

This ebook features an illustrated biography of Jimmy Breslin including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.

ABOUT Jimmy Breslin

  • BIOGRAPHY

    Jimmy Breslin (b. 1930) is a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist who has, for more than fifty years, been among the most prominent columnists in the United States. Born in Queens, New York, Breslin has worked in New York City newsrooms since the 1940s. He has been a columnist since 1963, when he won national attention by covering John F. Kennedy’s assassination from the emergency room in the Dallas Hospital and, later, from the point of view of the President’s gravedigger at Arlington Cemetery. He has run for citywide office on a secessionist platform, befriended and been beaten up by mobsters, and received letters from the Son of Sam during the serial killer’s infamous 1977 spree. Known as one of the best-informed journalists in the city, Breslin’s years of insightful reporting won him a Pulitzer in 1986, awarded for “columns which consistently champion ordinary citizens.” Although he stopped writing his weekly column for Newsday in 2004, Breslin still writes books, having produced nearly two dozen to date. He lives in Manhattan and continues to write.

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