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In one of his earliest cases, Ellery Queen confronts a murder in blue blood

America’s master of deduction, Ellery Queen, has made his name by combining dazzling feats of pure reason with the old-fashioned legwork that comes with being the son of a New York cop. Before he became the nation’s most famous sleuth, he was just an untested talent—a bookworm who thought he might put his genius to work solving crimes. Young Queen made his bones on the Khalkis case. The scion of a famous New York art-dealing family, Georg Khalkis has spent several years housebound with blindness—a misery he is relieved of when a heart attack knocks him dead on the library floor. After the funeral, his will vanishes, and an exhaustive search of home, churchyard, crypt, and mourners reveals nothing. Baffled, the police turn to a headstrong young genius named Ellery Queen. During this case, Queen develops his deductive method—and swings dramatically between failure and success.

ABOUT Ellery Queen

  • BIOGRAPHY

    Ellery Queen was a pen name created and shared by two cousins, Frederic Dannay (1905–1982) and Manfred B. Lee (1905–1971), as well as the name of their most famous detective. Born in Brooklyn, they spent forty-two years writing, editing, and anthologizing under the name, gaining a reputation as the foremost American authors of the Golden Age "fair play" mystery.

    Although eventually famous on television and radio, Queen's first appearance came in 1928 when the cousins won a mystery-writing contest with the book that would eventually be published as The Roman Hat Mystery. Their character was an amateur detective who uses his spare time to assist his police inspector father in solving baffling crimes. Besides writing the Queen novels, Dannay and Lee cofounded Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, one of the most influential crime publications of all time. Although Dannay outlived his cousin by nine years, he retired Queen upon Lee's death.

    Ellery Queen es un nombre de ficción por partida doble. Es tanto el pseudónimo literario de dos primos que escribían a cuatro manos, como el del detective que protagonizó sus elegantes misterios y les superó en fama. Frederic Dannay (1905-1982) y Manfred B. Lee (1905-1971) nacieron en Brooklyn y pasaron 42 años escribiendo y editando bajo este nombre. También fundaron la revista Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, una de las más prestigiosas de la edad de oro de la literatura de detectives. No faltaba un ejemplar de ella en ningún hogar donde hubiese alguien con ganas de entretenimiento de calidad. Aunque Dannay sobrevivió a su primo Lee, Ellery Queen dejó de existir en 1971, coincidiendo con la muerte del primo que daba vida con palabras a las intrigas imaginadas por el otro.