• Life in a Day by Doris Grumbach

      Life in a Day

      Doris Grumbach

      A look into the daily life of one of America’s great memoirists

      At seventy-seven Doris Grumbach is as sharp as ever, and in Life in a Day she examines the experiences of her later years, from the dreaded writer’s block to the many hours she has spent reading to the effects of an increasingly modern and interconnected world. Imbued with Grumbach’s characteristic candor and verve, Life in a Day is a celebration of the meaning to be found in the quotidian.

    • The Presence of Absence by Doris Grumbach

      The Presence of Absence

      Doris Grumbach

      The story of an ecstatic spiritual moment—and the search to experience it again

      When she was twenty-seven years old, writer Doris Grumbach had an epiphany. It was as if God were right there beside her, and she had a “feeling of peace so intense that it seemed to expand into ineffable joy.” After this fleeting moment, Grumbach became determined to recapture what she had felt. The Presence of Absence is the story of her fifty-year search.

      Grumbach is an open-minded and skilled seeker, and she writes candidly of the people she has met along the way. She details how she lost her path after decades of going to her Protestant church and writes of her turn to personal spirituality. In her quest to find God, she encounters a multitude of philosophies and gives all of them their due. She reads the works of Thomas Merton and Simone Weil, seeks the advice of her seminary-attending daughter, and studies the Psalms. Despite the setbacks of disease, injury, and ego, Grumbach perseveres in her pursuit of beauty and proof in the absence.

    • The Pleasure of Their Company by Doris Grumbach

      The Pleasure of Their Company

      Doris Grumbach

      A literary master looks ahead to her eighties

      As her eightieth birthday approaches, Doris Grumbach does not feel melancholy or saddened by the upcoming event, despite the loss of friends such as Kay Boyle and Dorothy Day—instead she takes it as an opportunity both to look backward and to grow. In this, her summer of unexpected content, Grumbach weaves the elegiac and the practical into a delightful tapestry of experience.

      She looks deep into her own history, telling stories of her life in the hardscrabble New York of the 1940s, working as a copyeditor. She details her near encounter with a seventy-two-year-old Bertrand Russell, calling it the closest she has ever come to sleeping with a Nobel Laureate. Grumbach lets us into her life and introduces us to the characters that have peopled her nearly eight decades on Earth. As the fateful day of her celebration draws near, the main topic on Doris Grumbach’s mind is not herself; it’s her guests.

      The Pleasure of Their Company is a meticulously planned party that any reader would be honored to attend.

    • Extra Innings by Doris Grumbach

      Extra Innings

      Doris Grumbach

      A New York Times Notable Book: A moving glimpse of a life shrewdly examined

      Extra Innings follows a year in the life of Doris Grumbach, beginning with the release of her previous memoir and journal, Coming into the End Zone, and revealing that the devoted essayist, novelist, and critic possesses as keen an eye in her seventies as she did when she wrote The Spoil of Flowers thirty years earlier.

      Grumbach details each passing month and the trials and tribulations therein. Age and experience have tempered her anger, allowing her to view the world in a rosier light than she has before. In this eventful period that concludes with her move from Washington, DC, to Maine, Grumbach travels between signings and speeches, describes her home life in a new state, and deals not only with her own mortality, but with that of her daughter. Grumbach’s wisdom and wit endure as she looks back on her own memories, seeing the world as only Doris Grumbach can.

    • Coming into the End Zone by Doris Grumbach

      Coming into the End Zone

      Doris Grumbach

      A New York Times Notable Book: One woman’s search for the value of a long life

      With the advent of her seventieth birthday, many changes have beset Doris Grumbach: the rapidly accelerating speed of the world around her, the premature deaths of her younger friends, her own increasing infirmities, and her move from cosmopolitan Washington, DC, to the calm of the Maine coast. Coming into the End Zone is an account of everything Grumbach observes over the course of a year. Astute observations and vivid memories of quotidian events pepper her story, which surprises even her with its fullness and vigor.

      Coming into the End Zone captures the days of a woman entering a new stage of life with humanity and abiding hope.

    • Fifty Days of Solitude by Doris Grumbach

      Fifty Days of Solitude

      Doris Grumbach

      A New York Times Notable Book: To truly understand herself, Doris Grumbach embraces solitude

      With a busy career as a novelist, essayist, reviewer, and bookstore owner, Doris Grumbach has little opportunity to be alone. However, after seventy-five years on the planet, she finally has her chance: Her partner has departed for an extended book-buying trip, and Grumbach has been given fifty days to relax, think, and write about her experience.

      In this graceful memoir, Grumbach delicately balances the beauty of turning one’s back on everything with the hardship of complete aloneness. Even as she attends church and collects her mail, she moves like a shadow, speaking to no one. Left only to her books and music in the midst of a Maine winter, she must look within herself for solace. The result of this reflection is a powerful meditation on the meaning of aging, writing, and one’s own company—and reaffirmation of the power of friends and companionship.

    • A World of Light by May Sarton

      A World of Light

      May Sarton

      This captivating book by May Sarton rejoices in friendship and family

      In A World of Light, renowned poet and novelist May Sarton renders unforgettable portraits of the friends she considers family—and the family she looks upon as friends. From her father, famed science historian George Sarton, she learns that work is “of the first importance.” Her mother, Mabel, an artist in her own right, is her “dearest friend.” Sarton also introduces us to fellow creative minds Elizabeth Bowen and Louise Brogan, Swiss vigneron Marc Turian, a New Hampshire painter named Quig, and many others.

      Sarton crosses oceans and continents as she chronicles the enduring connections she has made and how each has enriched her life. Tender and passionate, candid and evocative, A World of Light is about what it means to be an artist—and a human.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • The House by the Sea by May Sarton

      The House by the Sea

      May Sarton

      May Sarton charts her second act in Maine in this graceful elegy about life, love, work, and growing older

      When May Sarton uprooted her life after fifteen years in the refurbished New Hampshire house with the garden she tended so lovingly, she relied solely on instinct. And something told her it was time to move on. Accompanied by her wild cat, Bramble, and Tamas, a Shetland shepherd puppy—the first dog she ever owned—Sarton embarked on the next chapter of her life.

      The house she chose by the sea in the Maine village of York is completely isolated except during the summer months. Surrounded by nothing but endless ocean, woods, and vast skies, Sarton experiences a rare sense of peace. She creates a new garden and fears that in this tranquil state, she may never write again. But in her solitude—with its occasional interruptions for trips away and visits from friends—she realizes that creativity is constantly renewing itself. This journal offers fascinating insight into a remarkable woman and the work and friendships that form the twin pillars of her life.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • At Eighty-Two by May Sarton

      At Eighty-Two

      May Sarton

      May Sarton confronts the pleasures and compromises of old age in this deeply moving memoir completed a few months before she died

      In this poignant and fearless account, Sarton chronicles the struggles of life at eighty-two. She juxtaposes the quotidian details of life—battling a leaky roof, sharing an afternoon nap with her cat, the joy of buying a new mattress—with lyrical musings about work, celebrity, devoted friends, and the limitations wrought by the frailties of age. She creates poetry out of everyday existence, whether bemoaning a lack of recognition by the literary establishment or the devastation wrought by a series of strokes. Incapacitated by illness, Sarton relies on friends for the little things she always took for granted. As she becomes more and more aware of “what holds life together in a workable whole,” she takes solace in flowers and chocolate and reading letters from devoted fans. This journal takes us into the heart and mind of an extraordinary artist and woman, and is a must-read for Sarton devotees and anyone facing the reality of growing older.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • At Seventy by May Sarton

      At Seventy

      May Sarton

      May Sarton’s honest and engrossing journal of her seventieth year, spent living and working on the Maine coast

      May Sarton’s journals are a captivating look at a rich artistic life. In this, her ode to aging, she savors the daily pleasures of tending to her garden, caring for her dogs, and entertaining guests at her beloved Maine home by the sea. Her reminiscences are raw, and her observations are infused with the poetic candor for which Sarton—over the course of her decades-long career—became known.

      An enlightening glimpse into a time—the early 1980s—and an age, At Seventy is at once specific and universal, providing a unique window into septuagenarian life that readers of all generations will enjoy. At times mournful and at others hopeful, this is a beautiful memoir of the year in which Sarton, looking back on it all, could proclaim, “I am more myself than I have ever been.”


    • Recovering by May Sarton

      Recovering

      May Sarton

      An affecting diary of one year’s hardships and healing, by one of the twentieth century’s most extraordinary memoirists

      For decades, readers have celebrated May Sarton’s journals for their candid look at relationships, success and failure, communion with nature, and the curious stages of aging. In Recovering, Sarton focuses on her sixty-sixth year—one marked by the turmoil of a mastectomy, the end of a treasured relationship, and the loneliness that visits a life of chosen solitude. Each deeply felt entry in the journal, written between 1978 and 1979, is laced with poignancy and honesty as she grapples with a cold reception for her latest novel, the sad descent of a close friend into senility, and other struggles.

      Despite the trials of this one painful year, Sarton writes of her progression toward a hard-won renewal, achieved through good friendships, the levity provided by her cherished dog, and peaceful days in her garden.

      A candid account of Sarton’s revival from personal darkness back into light, Recovering is another stunning entry in the author’s irrepressible oeuvre.

    • I Knew a Phoenix by May Sarton

      I Knew a Phoenix

      May Sarton

      May Sarton’s first memoir: A lyrical and enchanting look at her formative years from the onset of the First World War through the beginning of the Second

      Author of a dozen memoirs, May Sarton had a unique talent for capturing the wonder and beauty of nature, love, aging, and art. Throughout her prolific career, she penned many journals examining the different stages of her life, and in this, her first memoir, she laid the foundation for what would become one of the most beloved autobiographical oeuvres in modern literature.

      Sarton writes of her early childhood in Belgium in the years before World War I, her time in Boston while her father taught at Harvard, and her schooling in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she fell in love with poetry and theater. She describes her first meetings and fast friendships with such notable figures as Virginia Woolf, Julian Huxley, James Stephens, and S. S. Koteliansky, many of whom would later come to populate her critically acclaimed journals.

      With sharp insights and captivating prose, I Knew a Phoenix introduces a generation of readers to one of the twentieth century’s most cherished writers.

    • Journal of a Solitude by May Sarton

      Journal of a Solitude

      May Sarton

      May Sarton’s bestselling memoir of a solitary year spent at the house she bought and renovated

      “Loneliness is the poverty of self; solitude is richness of self.” —May Sarton

      May Sarton’s parrot chatters away as Sarton looks out the window at the rain and contemplates returning to her “real” life—not friends, not even love, but writing. In her bravest and most revealing memoir, Sarton casts her keenly observant eye on both the interior and exterior worlds. She shares insights about everyday life in the quiet New Hampshire village of Nelson, the desire for friends, and need for solitude—both an exhilarating and terrifying state. She likens writing to “cracking open the inner world again,” which sometimes plunges her into depression. She confesses her fears, her disappointments, her unresolved angers. Sarton’s garden is her great, abiding joy, sustaining her through seasons of psychic and emotional pain.

      Journal of a Solitude is a moving and profound meditation on creativity, oneness with nature, and the courage it takes to be alone. Both uplifting and cathartic, it sweeps us along on Sarton’s pilgrimage inward.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • Plant Dreaming Deep by May Sarton

      Plant Dreaming Deep

      May Sarton

      After a peripatetic life, forty-five-year-old May Sarton longed to put down roots and found them in New Hampshire in the form of a dilapidated eighteenth-century farmhouse with good bones . . . It was the realization of a dream that had been a long time coming

      In Plant Dreaming Deep, Sarton shares an intensely personal account of transforming a house into a home. She begins with an introduction to the enchanting village of Nelson, where she first meets her house. Sarton finds she must “dream the house alive” inside herself before taking the major step of signing the deed. She paints the walls white in order to catch the light and searches for the precise shade of yellow for the kitchen floor. She discovers peace and beauty in solitude, whether she is toiling in the garden or writing at her desk.

      This is a loving, beautifully crafted memoir illuminated by themes of friendship, love, nature, and the struggles of the creative life.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • Gluck by Diana Souhami
      Diana Souhami’s critically acclaimed biography of lesbian painter Hannah Gluckstein—the woman, the artist, the legend

      To her family, Hannah Gluckstein was known as Hig. To Edith Shackleton Heald, the journalist with whom she lived for almost forty years, she was Dearest Grub. And to the art world, she was simply Gluck.

      She was born in 1895 into a life of privilege. Her family had founded J. Lyons & Co., a vast catering empire. From the beginning Gluck was a rebel. At a time when only men wore trousers, she scandalized society with her masculine clothing—though she always dressed with style and turned androgyny into high fashion. Her affairs with high-profile women shocked her conservative family, even while she achieved fame as an artist.

      During the 1920s and thirties, Gluck’s paintings—portraits, flowers, and landscapes, presented in frames designed and patented by her—were the toast of the town. At the height of her success, when wounded in love, her own obsessions caused her to fade for decades from the public eye, but then, at nearly eighty, her return to the spotlight ensured her immortality.
    • Last Watch of the Night by Paul Monette

      Last Watch of the Night

      Paul Monette

      Tender and passionate autobiographical essays by National Book Award winner Paul Monette

      “Does it go too fast?” Monette asks about life at the beginning of one piece. The answer is a resounding “yes” for the individuals who populate this stunning work of nonfiction. These ten autobiographical essays memorialize those whose lives have been claimed by AIDS. Following Becoming a Man and Borrowed Time, Last Watch of the Night is Monette’s third and final self-portrait. In this collection, he confronts death—those of lovers and friends, and even his own eventual demise—with both bravery and compassion.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.
    • Knowing When to Stop by Ned Rorem

      Knowing When to Stop

      Ned Rorem

      A thrilling, poignant, and bold memoir of the early years and accomplishments—both musical and sexual—of renowned contemporary composer Ned Rorem

      Ned Rorem, arguably the greatest composer of art songs that America has produced in more than a hundred years, is also revered as a diarist and essayist whose unexpurgated writings are at once enthralling, enlightening, and provocative. In Knowing When to Stop, one of the most creative American artists of our time offers readers a colorful narrative of his first twenty-seven years, expertly unraveling the intriguing conundrum of who he truly is and how he came to be that way.

      As the author himself writes, “A memoir is not a diary. Diaries are written in the heat of battle, memoirs in the repose of retrospect.” But careful thought and consideration have not dulled the sharp point of Rorem’s pen as he writes openly of his life and loves, his missteps and triumphs, and offers frank and fascinating portraits of the luminaries in his circle: Aaron Copland, Truman Capote, Jean Cocteau, Martha Graham, Igor Stravinsky, Billie Holliday, Paul Bowles, and Alfred C. Kinsey, to name a few. The result is an early life story that is riveting, moving, and intimate—a magnificent self-portrait of one of the great minds of this age.

    • Double Life by Alan Shayne

      Double Life

      Alan Shayne

      Gay marriage is at the forefront of America’s political battles
      The human story at the center of this debate is told in Double Life, a dual memoir by a gay male couple in a fifty-plus year relationship. With high profiles in the entertainment, advertising, and art communities, the authors offer a virtual timeline of how gay relationships have gained acceptance in the last half-century. At the same time, they share inside stories from film, television, and media featuring the likes of Marlon Brando, Katharine Hepburn, Rock Hudson, Barbra Streisand, Laurence Olivier, Truman Capote, Bette Davis, Robert Redford, Lee Radziwill, and Frances Lear.
      Double Life
      is a trip through the entertainment world and a gay partnership in the latter half of the twentieth century. As more and more same sex couples find it possible to say “I do,” the book serves as an important document of how far we’ve come.
    • Close to the Knives by David Wojnarowicz

      Close to the Knives

      David Wojnarowicz

       

      The savage, beautiful, and unforgettable memoirs of an extraordinary artist, activist, and iconoclast who lit up the New York art scene in the late twentieth century

      David Wojnarowicz’s brief but eventful life was not easy. From a suburban adolescence marked by neglect, drugs, prostitution, and abuse to a squalid life on the streets of New York City, to fame—and infamy—as an activist and controversial visual artist whose work was lambasted in the halls of Congress, all before his early death from AIDS at age thirty-seven, Wojnarowicz seemed to be at war with a homophobic “establishment” and the world itself. Yet what emerged from the darkness was a truly extraordinary artist and human being—an angry young man of remarkable poetic sensibilities who was inordinately sympathetic to those who, like him, lived and struggled outside society’s boundaries.

      Close to the Knives is his searing yet strangely beautiful account told in a collection of powerful essays. An author whom reviewers have compared to Kerouac and Genet, David Wojnarowicz mesmerizes, horrifies, and delights in equal measure with his unabashed honesty. At once savage and funny, poignant and sexy, compassionate and unforgiving, his words and stories cut like knives, leaving indelible marks on all who read them.

       

    • Journal of a Solitude by May Sarton

      Journal of a Solitude

      May Sarton

      May Sarton’s bestselling memoir of a solitary year spent at the house she bought and renovated

      “Loneliness is the poverty of self; solitude is richness of self.” —May Sarton

      May Sarton’s parrot chatters away as Sarton looks out the window at the rain and contemplates returning to her “real” life—not friends, not even love, but writing. In her bravest and most revealing memoir, Sarton casts her keenly observant eye on both the interior and exterior worlds. She shares insights about everyday life in the quiet New Hampshire village of Nelson, the desire for friends, and need for solitude—both an exhilarating and terrifying state. She likens writing to “cracking open the inner world again,” which sometimes plunges her into depression. She confesses her fears, her disappointments, her unresolved angers. Sarton’s garden is her great, abiding joy, sustaining her through seasons of psychic and emotional pain.

      Journal of a Solitude is a moving and profound meditation on creativity, oneness with nature, and the courage it takes to be alone. Both uplifting and cathartic, it sweeps us along on Sarton’s pilgrimage inward.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • Montgomery Clift by Patricia Bosworth

      Montgomery Clift

      Patricia Bosworth

      Bosworth’s unforgettable portrait of one of Hollywood’s most magnetic, timeless, and tragic stars—Montgomery CliftFrom the moment he leapt to stardom with the films Red River and A Place in the Sun, Montgomery Clift was acclaimed by critics and loved by fans. Elegant, moody, and strikingly handsome, he became one of the most definitive actors of the 1950s, the first of Hollywood’s “loner heroes,” a group that includes Marlon Brando and James Dean. In this affecting biography, Patricia Bosworth explores the complex inner life and desires of the renowned actor. She traces a poignant trajectory: Clift’s childhood was dominated by a controlling, class-obsessed mother who never left him alone. He developed passionate friendships with Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor in spite of his closeted homosexuality. Then his face was destroyed after a traumatic car crash outside Taylor’s house. He continued to make films, but the loss of his beauty and subsequent addictions finally brought the curtain down on his career. Stunning and heartrending, Montgomery Clift is a remarkable tribute to one of Hollywood’s most gifted—and tormented—actors.
    • An Absolute Gift by Ned Rorem

      An Absolute Gift

      Ned Rorem

      A magnificent collection of essays, opinions, and reflections on life, culture, art, love, and music—always lyrical, witty, and brazenly provocative—from one of the most acclaimed contemporary American composers

      Time magazine has called Ned Rorem “the world’s best composer of art songs.” But his genius does not end in the realm of classical music. Rorem has a rare gift for writing, as well, and the wide acclaim that has greeted his memoirs, essay collections, and published diaries attest to this fact.

      An Absolute Gift is a cornucopia of Roremisms—essays, reviews, and opinions on a vast array of fascinating subjects, from music to film to drama to sex. Here also are candid diary entries, displaying the frankness and remarkable insight for which Rorem is known. Whether he’s lambasting or celebrating the world’s great musical works and their creators (and, according to Stephen Sondheim, “He is one of the best writers about music that I have ever read”), offering intensely personal musings on death and love, or brilliantly dissecting the artist’s craft, Ned Rorem is always fascinating, always provocative, and enormously entertaining.

    • Critical Affairs by Ned Rorem

      Critical Affairs

      Ned Rorem

      Acclaimed composer Ned Rorem delights and provokes with a fearless collection of vivid memories, critiques, and musings on life, music, and his world

      Pulitzer Prize–winning American composer Ned Rorem has been lauded for his art songs, symphonies, operas, and other orchestral works. With Critical Affairs, as with his other literary works, the great maestro once again demonstrates that he is a master of words as well as music. Winner of the ASCAP Deems Taylor Award, Critical Affairs opens a window into the brilliant mind of a multi-talented artist and acute observer of the world around him.

      Rorem is fearless—sometimes shameless—in critiques of his contemporaries and their work. He gives glowing praise to those who merit it and tears down those he feels do not with a sharp and cunning wit. His remembrances of past challenges and conquests, both artistic and sexual, alternately scandalize and mesmerize, and his thoughts on everything from Walt Whitman to rock music carry weight and substance. Through it all, the author retains his unique charm and grace, whether he’s confidently confessing a shocking personal indiscretion or remembering with lyrical fondness a late musical giant who helped to shape his extraordinary career.

    • The Later Diaries of Ned Rorem by Ned Rorem

      The Later Diaries of Ned Rorem

      Ned Rorem

      The esteemed American composer and unabashed diarist Ned Rorem provides a fascinating, brazenly intimate first-person account of his life and career during one of the most extraordinary decades of the twentieth century

      Ned Rorem is often considered an American treasure, one of the greatest contemporary composers in the US. In 1966, he revealed another side of his remarkable talent when The Paris Diary was published, and a year later, The New York Diary, both to wide critical acclaim. In The Later Diaries, Rorem continues to explore his world and his music in intimate journal form, covering the years 1961 to 1972, one of his most artistically productive decades.

      The Ned Rorem revealed in The Later Diaries is somewhat more mature and worldly than the young artist of the earlier works, but no less candid or daring, as he reflects on his astonishing life, loves, friendships, and rivalries during an epoch of staggering, sometimes volatile change. Writing with intelligence, insight, and honesty, he recalls time spent with some of the most famous, and infamous, artists of the era—Philip Roth, Christopher Isherwood, Tallulah Bankhead, and Edward Albee, among others—openly exploring his sexuality and his art while offering fascinating, sometimes blistering, views on the art of his contemporaries.

    • The Nantucket Diary of Ned Rorem by Ned Rorem

      The Nantucket Diary of Ned Rorem

      Ned Rorem

      The acclaimed author of The Paris Diary, Pulitzer Prize–winning American composer Ned Rorem offers readers a mellow, thoughtful, and candid chronicle of his life, work, and contemporaries

      One of our most revered contemporary musical artists—winner of the Pulitzer Prize and declared “the world’s best composer of art songs” by Time magazine—Ned Rorem writes that he is “a composer who writes, not a writer who composes.” Despite this claim, Rorem’s published diaries, memoirs, essay collections, and other nonfiction works have all received resounding acclaim for their lyricism, bold honesty, and insightful social commentary.

      His Nantucket Diary, covering the years 1973 through 1985, reveals a more mature and graceful Ned Rorem, a man who has experienced great loss and serious illness yet has lost none of his acute observational skills and keenly opinionated nature. His wit remains bracing and his candor refreshing as he offers sharp critiques on the state of modern classical music and its creators. His accounts of times shared with luminaries and legends, musical and otherwise (including Leonard Bernstein, Edward Albee, Virgil Thomson, and Stephen Sondheim) are consistently enthralling and delightful. The outspoken hedonist of The Paris Diary may be older and more subdued now, but his incisive observations and unique outlook on life, both personal and creative, remain an unforgettable reading experience.

    • The Nantucket Diary of Ned Rorem by Ned Rorem

      The Nantucket Diary of Ned Rorem

      Ned Rorem

      The acclaimed author of The Paris Diary, Pulitzer Prize–winning American composer Ned Rorem offers readers a mellow, thoughtful, and candid chronicle of his life, work, and contemporaries

      One of our most revered contemporary musical artists—winner of the Pulitzer Prize and declared “the world’s best composer of art songs” by Time magazine—Ned Rorem writes that he is “a composer who writes, not a writer who composes.” Despite this claim, Rorem’s published diaries, memoirs, essay collections, and other nonfiction works have all received resounding acclaim for their lyricism, bold honesty, and insightful social commentary.

      His Nantucket Diary, covering the years 1973 through 1985, reveals a more mature and graceful Ned Rorem, a man who has experienced great loss and serious illness yet has lost none of his acute observational skills and keenly opinionated nature. His wit remains bracing and his candor refreshing as he offers sharp critiques on the state of modern classical music and its creators. His accounts of times shared with luminaries and legends, musical and otherwise (including Leonard Bernstein, Edward Albee, Virgil Thomson, and Stephen Sondheim) are consistently enthralling and delightful. The outspoken hedonist of The Paris Diary may be older and more subdued now, but his incisive observations and unique outlook on life, both personal and creative, remain an unforgettable reading experience.

    • The Paris Diary & The New York Diary by Ned Rorem

      The Paris Diary & The New York Diary

      Ned Rorem

      In the earliest published diaries of Ned Rorem, the acclaimed American composer recalls a bygone era and its luminaries, celebrates the creative process, and examines the gay culture of Europe and the US during the 1950s

      One of America’s most significant contemporary composers, Ned Rorem is also widely acclaimed as a diarist of unique insight and refreshing candor. Together, his Paris Diary, first published in 1966, and The New York Diary,which followed a year later, paint a colorful landscape of Rorem’s world and its famous inhabitants, as well as a fascinating self-portrait of a footloose young artist unabashedly drinking deeply of life. In this amalgam of forthright personal reflections and cogent social commentary, unprecedented for its time, Rorem’s anecdotal recollections of the decade from 1951 to 1961 represent Gay Liberation in its infancy as the author freely expresses his open sexuality not as a revelation but as a simple fact of life.

      At once blisteringly honest and exquisitely entertaining, Rorem’s diaries expound brilliantly on the creative process, following their peripatetic author from Paris to Morocco to Italy and back home to America as he crosses paths with Picasso, Cocteau, Gide, Boulez, and other luminaries of the era.

      With consummate skill and unexpurgated insight, a younger, wilder Rorem reflects on a bygone time and culture and, in doing so, holds a revealing mirror to himself.

    • Setting the Tone by Ned Rorem

      Setting the Tone

      Ned Rorem

      A sterling collection of essays, commentary, reviews, and personal recollections on art, love, and the musical life, from Ned Rorem, award-winning composer and author extraordinaire

      Ned Rorem, the acclaimed American composer and writer, displays his incisive, sometimes outrageous genius for artistic critique and social commentary with a grand flourish in this engaging collection of essays and diary entries. Fearlessly offering opinions on a wealth of subjects—from the lives of the famous and infamous to popular culture to the state of contemporary art—Rorem proves once again that he is an artist who tells unforgettable stories not only through music, but with a pen, as well.

      Setting the Tone gathers together essays and commentary previously published elsewhere and combines them with pages from Rorem’s ongoing diary, offering readers a vivid and enlightening view of Rorem’s world along with an honest portrait of the author himself. Whether he’s lambasting critics and former friends and acquaintances, vivisecting opera, or presenting his views on theater, film, books, or composers and their music, Rorem is ingenious, incorrigible, and madly entertaining.

    • In the Shadow of the American Dream by David Wojnarowicz

      In the Shadow of the American Dream

      David Wojnarowicz

       

      From life in the streets and love in the alleys to fame in the spotlight and an untimely death—raw, biting, and brilliant selections from the personal journals of one of the most uniquely creative artists of the late twentieth century

      When his life ended at age thirty-seven—a casualty of the AIDS epidemic that took so many before their time—David Wojnarowicz had long since established himself as one of America’s most vital artists and activists. In the Shadow of the American Dream is a stunning collection of riveting and revealing chapters from Wojnarowicz’s extensive personal diaries—thirty volumes’ worth of memories and lucid observations, some bitter, some sweet—that the author began writing when he was seventeen and continued until his death two decades later. Here is a brilliant chronicle of an artist’s emergence—a young man’s still achingly fresh memories of his unhappy adolescence and his glorious discovery of self. Wojnarowicz recalls his life on Manhattan’s Lower East Side with no shame or regret, and shares his hitchhiking journeys across the country. He talks of art and love and sex—embracing who he is fully and accepting his heartbreaking fate without pathos—while providing fascinating glimpses into the vibrant and colorful New York art scene and poignant views of life and death among the AIDS community.

      At once frightening and courageous, joyous and disturbing, enlightening and honest, In the Shadow of the American Dream is a treasured addition to the enduring literary legacy of David Wojnarowicz and a true testament to his unique brilliance.

       

    • The Motion of Light in Water by Samuel R. Delany

      The Motion of Light in Water

      Samuel R. Delany

      In the bohemian sixties, a young writer tries to make sense of his life
      With the poet Marilyn Hacker, Delany moves into a tenement on a dead-end street that the landlord reserves for interracial couples. Between playing folk music in the evenings at the same Greenwich Village coffee shop as Bob Dylan and preparing shrimp curry for W. H. Auden and Chester Khalman, who have accepted an invitation that night for dinner, Delany takes a stab at writing science fiction. This young prodigy would complete and sell five novels before he turned twenty-two! (And then have a nervous breakdown . . .) This beautifully written memoir is a testament to a neighborhood where experimentation was a way of life.
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Samuel R. Delany including rare images from his early career.
    • Fork on the Left, Knife in the Back by Michael Musto

      Fork on the Left, Knife in the Back

      Michael Musto

      For over a quarter of a century, Michael Musto entertained the country with his column “La Dolce Musto” in the Village Voice; fabulous, funny, and flippant, this collection is an insider’s guide to the glittering highs and desperate lows of New York City’s more colorful residents

      Hailed by the New York Times as “the city’s most punny, raunchy, and self-referential gossip columnist,” Michael Musto doled out wit and wisdom in his weekly Village Voice column for twenty-nine years. This waggish and wise book contains highlights from his published pieces as well as several original essays.

      With his trademark slashing humor, Musto weighs in on everything from celebrities in need of counseling to cheap thrill–seeking and why weirdos are his heroes. No one is spared, including the self-proclaimed “King of Gossip” himself. His interviews and profiles of Paris Hilton, Sandra Bernhard, Crispin Glover, Kiki and Herb, Sarah Silverman, and other fringe celebrities are priceless, made all the more vivid by Musto’s extraordinary access. Catty, titillating, and endlessly enthralling, Fork on the Left, Knife in the Back is a feast for the senses—a must-have book for Musto devotees and fans of popular culture.

      This ebook features an introduction by the author.
    • The Drowning of Stephan Jones by Bette Greene

      The Drowning of Stephan Jones

      Bette Greene

      Based on true events, The Drowning of Stephan Jones tells the harrowing story of one small town’s brush with homophobia Sensitive Carla Wayland certainly doesn’t know anyone who is gay, not in her small hometown of Rachetville, Arkansas. While everyone says homosexuality is a sin, Carla doesn’t know what to think. But her mother, the town librarian, always stands up for what she knows is right, even when it isn’t popular, and Carla loves her for that. Then Frank Montgomery and Stephan Jones, a gay couple, move into town. Tempers flare, and the town’s friendly residents—led by the Baptist preacher, Reverend Roland Wheelwright—soon show their true colors. Carla is horrified, but even Andy Harris, her longtime crush and now boyfriend, seems to agree that homosexuality is an abomination, to be wiped out. When Andy and his friends take their cause a little too far, will Carla be able to defy the majority and speak up for justice? This ebook features an illustrated biography of Bette Greene including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.
    • Promise Me Something by Sara Kocek

      Promise Me Something

      Sara Kocek

      As if starting high school weren’t bad enough, Reyna Fey has to do so at a new school without her best friends. Reyna’s plan is to keep her head down, help her father recover from the car accident that almost took his life, and maybe even make some friends. And then Olive Barton notices her. Olive is not exactly the kind of new friend Reyna has in mind. The boys make fun of her, the girls want to fight her, and Olive seems to welcome the challenge. There’s something about Olive that Reyna can’t help but like. But when Reyna learns Olive’s secret, she must decide whether it’s better to be good friends with an outcast or fake friends with the popular kids . . . before she loses Olive forever.
    • Night Kites by M. E. Kerr

      Night Kites

      M. E. Kerr

       

      What do you do when your whole world is blown apart? A seventeen-year-old confronts love, betrayal, and his brother’s illness in this brave, deeply compassionate novel by M. E. Kerr
      Life is going great for Seaville High senior Erick Rudd. He’s a good student, he has a girlfriend he’ll probably marry, and he’s on a straight path to college. Then his best friend’s girlfriend lets him know she’s attracted to him. Seventeen going on twenty-five, Nicki Marr is blond, green eyed, and gorgeous. Soon, Erick is seeing her on the sly.
      Guilt ridden over his deception, Erick isn’t prepared for what happens next. He finds out that his brother, Pete, who’s ten years older and lives in New York, is very sick . . . with AIDS. Erick is stunned; he didn’t even know his brother was gay. It was Pete who told a five-year-old Erick that night kites don’t think about the dark, that they’re not afraid to be different.
      How Erick and his parents deal with Pete’s illness—and how Erick handles his relationship with Nicki—are what make this book so unforgettable. Fearless and profoundly affecting, it will stay with you long after the last page is turned.
      This ebook features an illustrated personal history of M. E. Kerr including rare images from the author’s collection.

       

    • Deliver Us from Evie by M. E. Kerr

      Deliver Us from Evie

      M. E. Kerr

       

      Award-winning author M. E. Kerr challenges stereotypes in this story about a fifteen-year-old grappling with his older sister’s sexuality
      Parr Burrman lives with his parents and his older brother and sister on a farm in Missouri. They’re a typical Midwestern family—except for one thing.
      Parr’s father thinks Evie’s going to marry Cord Whittle, who’s had a crush on her forever, and settle down in their hometown to help out with the farm. Instead, she falls in love with Patsy Duff, the gorgeous, privileged daughter of the banker who holds the mortgage on the Burrmans’ property. When rumors start flying about Evie and Patsy, Parr has to contend with the derision of his classmates . . . and when he falls for a girl from a fundamentalist family who fears homosexuality like God’s wrath, he must face his own conflicted emotions. Soon, Parr’s parents—and the whole town—will know the truth about Evie. But it’s Parr who has to deal with the burden of shame when his own behavior leads to a shattering betrayal . . . and a secret he’ll carry to the grave.
      Written with grace, humor, and love, and featuring sympathetic characters you won’t soon forget, Deliver Us from Evie is a compassionate, vividly evocative novel by a master storyteller.
      This ebook features an illustrated personal history of M. E. Kerr including rare images from the author’s collection.

       

    • Shockproof Sydney Skate by Marijane Meaker

      Shockproof Sydney Skate

      Marijane Meaker

       

      A uniquely witty novel exploring sex, freedom, and the process of growing up

      Sydney Skate considers himself shockproof. For as long as he can remember, he’s known that his fashionable Manhattan mother is secretly a lesbian, although he’s never let on that he knows. He spends his summer days caring for snakes at the local pet shop before leaving for college at Cornell, shrugging off his father’s demands that he skip college and join the exciting world of swimming pool sales for suburbanites.

      Far from throwing himself into work, Sydney can’t seem to keep his thoughts from wandering to women. He has memorized the sex scenes of every book he’s ever read in order to better seduce the opposite gender. When he’s called to help remove a snake from a bathtub that belongs to the gorgeous and sophisticated Alison Gray, everything changes. But nothing could prepare him for his glamorous mother sweeping the girl of his dreams off her feet.

      This hypnotizing coming-of-age story captures the timeless ecstasies and struggles of adolescence, and has been a classic of lesbian literature since it was first published in 1973. Hailed as the Catcher in the Rye of the seventies, Shockproof Sydney Skate exposes the confusion of its time and remains keenly relevant to the sexual absurdities of today.

      This ebook features an illustrated personal history of Marijane Meaker including rare images from the author’s collection.

       

    • When Love Comes to Town by Tom Lennon

      When Love Comes to Town

      Tom Lennon

      The year is 1990, and in his hometown of Dublin, Ireland, Neil Byrne plays rugby, keeps up with the in-crowd at his school, and is just a regular guy. A guy who’s gay. It’s a secret he keeps from the wider world as he explores the city at night and struggles to figure out how to reveal his real self—and to whom. First published in Ireland in 1993 and compared to The Catcher in the Rye by critics, Tom Lennon’s When Love Comes to Town is told with honesty, humor, and originality.
    • "Hello," I Lied

      M. E. Kerr

       

      From the Margaret A. Edwards Award–winning author of Deliver Us from Evie comes a novel about a gay teenager who discovers a different kind of love during an unforgettable summer in the Hamptons
      I’d always think of it as the summer that I loved a girl . . .
      Seventeen-year-old Lang Penner and his mother are spending the summer in the caretaker’s cottage at Roundelay, the sprawling East Hampton estate of legendary rocker Ben Nevada. Lang passes the time walking on the beach and hoping for a glimpse of his idol. When they finally meet, Nevada is very different from the man Lang imagined. He finds himself confiding in the retired star about his homosexuality. When Nevada hears Lang’s secret, he figures Lang is a safe bet to show the seventeen-year-old daughter of some friends from France a good time in the Hamptons. This was supposed to be the summer of Lang’s coming out. He even has a boyfriend, Alex, a twenty-year-old actor living in Manhattan. The last thing he expects is to become infatuated with a girl.
      “Hello,” I Lied is a story about all kinds of love—from friendship to physical attraction to hero worship—as a teenager bravely confronts his sexuality.
      This ebook features an illustrated personal history of M. E. Kerr including rare images from the author’s collection.

       

    • Jacob's New Dress by Sarah Hoffman

      Jacob's New Dress

      Sarah Hoffman

      Jacob loves playing dress-up, when he can be anything he wants to be. Some kids at school say he can’t wear “girl” clothes, but Jacob wants to wear a dress to school. Can he convince his parents to let him wear what he wants? This heartwarming story speaks to the unique challenges faced by boys who don’t identify with traditional gender roles.
      This is a fixed-format ebook, which preserves the design and layout of the original print book.

    • Surprising Myself by Christopher Bram

      Surprising Myself

      Christopher Bram

      Seventeen-year-old Joel can’t be gay if he’s straight
      After four years of living with relatives in Switzerland, seventeen-year-old Joel Scherzenlieb finds himself in the United States for the summer, working at a Boy Scout camp. There, he meets nineteen-year-old Corey Cobbett, a fellow counselor who's the only person Joel wants to be friends with. Soon, Joel’s sarcastic, distant CIA father shows up and whisks him away to live with his mother, grandmother, and older sister on a farm in Virginia—he’s not going back to Switzerland after all. As his father pleads poverty and his dreams of going to college vanish, Joel faces his longest year yet. But everything changes when Corey returns to his life, bringing with him the discovery and excitement of reciprocal love.
    • In Such Dark Places by Joseph Caldwell

      In Such Dark Places

      Joseph Caldwell

      When a photographer witnesses a violent crime in New York’s Lower East Side, he hunts down the missing camera that may hold answers
      Eugene is a midwesterner living in New York, an erstwhile Catholic and not-quite-openly-gay photographer. When a Holy Week pageant in the gritty Lower East Side erupts into a riot, he is sucked into the city’s shadowy depths. While photographing the parade, Eugene has his eye on a handsome teen, but when things turn violent the youth is stabbed and Eugene’s camera is stolen. To find the camera and its precious film, which may provide evidence, Eugene has to become acquainted with a seedy, unfamiliar world, and hold on to his sanity in the process. In Such Dark Places is a thrilling debut novel of awakening and obsession.
    • Consenting Adult by Laura Z. Hobson

      Consenting Adult

      Laura Z. Hobson

      In the shifting social landscape of America in the 1960s, a mother struggles to understand—and accept—her son’s homosexuality

      Tessa Lynn considers herself independent and progressive, a liberated woman of the 1960s. And yet, when she receives a letter from her youngest son, Jeff, informing her that he is gay, Tessa is distraught. At a time when homosexuality is regarded as a mental illness, she struggles with how best to be a parent to a gay son—and how to protect her family from the prejudices of the era.Elegant and subtly drawn, Consenting Adult is a stunning tribute to familial bonds, and a sympathetic portrait of a mother whose best intentions are often clouded by the stereotypes of her time.
    • Range of Light by Valerie Miner

      Range of Light

      Valerie Miner

      Two old friends who have not seen each other for decades spend a week hiking through the stunning scenery of California’s High Sierra

      Twenty-five years ago, a group of five high schoolers trekked through the High Sierra. Now, two of them—lesbian Kath and straight Adele—come back to repeat their journey and renew their friendship. In chapters that alternate between the women’s voices, they reveal their pasts, their thoughts, and their reactions both to the scenery and to each other. For Kath, the sublime topography of the Sierra is inspiring and invigorating. Adele is more trepidatious. Over the course of their journey up to High Country, old stories, tensions, dreams, and disappointments come to the surface.

      A unique study of the complexity of the bonds between women, this transporting book, written with elegance and restraint, is among Miner’s finest work.
    • The Charioteer by Mary Renault

      The Charioteer

      Mary Renault

      Mary Renault’s landmark novel about a wounded soldier who returns from the front and must choose between relationships with two very different men
      After being wounded at Dunkirk in World War II, Laurie Odell is sent back home to a rural British hospital. Standing out among the orderlies is Andrew, a bright conscientious objector raised as a Quaker. The unspoken romance between the two men is tested when Ralph, a friend of Laurie’s from school, re-enters his life, introducing him into a milieu of jaded, experienced gay men. Will Laurie reconcile himself to Ralph’s embrace, or can he offer Andrew the idealized, Platonic intimacy he yearns for?
      This novel has been called one of the foundation stones of gay literary fiction, ranking alongside James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room and Gore Vidal’s The City and the Pillar. Celebrated for its literary brilliance and sincere depiction of complex human emotions, The Charioteer is a stirring and beautifully rendered portrayal of love.
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Mary Renault including rare images of the author.
    • The Friendly Young Ladies by Mary Renault

      The Friendly Young Ladies

      Mary Renault

       

      A wry romp through 1930s mores, social and sexual
      Progressive for its time as well as ours, The Friendly Young Ladies is a deftly witty comedy set in England between the wars. At eighteen, Elsie has had enough of life at her bickering parents’ Cornwall home. She decides to join up with her bohemian older sister, Leo, in the city. Leo’s life is full of surprises—not least her significant other, Helen, a beautiful nurse. As Elsie gets acquainted with Leo’s world, new characters—including a novelist and a doctor deluded enough to chase all three women at once—come into play. With acid humor and a supremely light touch, The Friendly Young Ladies colors in an unseen dimension of the 1930s.

       

    • Desert of the Heart by Jane Rule

      Desert of the Heart

      Jane Rule

      “A landmark work of lesbian fiction.” —The New York Times

      Jane Rule’s first novel—now a classic of gay and lesbian literature—established her as a foremost writer of the vagaries and yearnings of the female heart 

      Against the backdrop of Reno, Nevada, in the late 1950s, award-winning author Jane Rule chronicles a love affair between two women.
       
      When Desert of the Heart opens, Evelyn Hall is on a plane that will take her from her old life in Oakland, California, to Reno, where she plans to divorce her husband of sixteen years. A voluntary exile in a brave new world, she meets a woman who will change her life.
       
      Fifteen years younger, Ann Childs works as a change apron in a casino. Evelyn is instantly drawn to the fiercely independent Ann, and their friendship soon evolves into a romantic relationship. An English professor who had always led a conventional life, Evelyn suddenly finds all her beliefs about love, morality, and identity called into question.
       
      Peopled by a cast of unforgettable characters, this is a novel that dares to ask whether love between two women can last. 

    • Loving Her by Ann Allen Shockley
      A groundbreaking novel of two very different women, one black and one white, and a remarkable love threatened by prejudice, rage, and violence
      A struggling African American musician, Renay married Jerome Lee when she discovered she was pregnant with his child. Yet even before their daughter, Denise, was born, Renay realized what a terrible mistake she had made, tying herself to a violent, abusive alcoholic. Then, while performing at an upscale supper club, Renay met Terry Bluvard. Beautiful, wealthy, and white, Terry awakened feelings that the talented black pianist had never realized she possessed—and before long, Renay was leaving the nightmare of Jerome Lee behind and moving with little Denise into Terry’s world of luxury and privilege.
      Now, in this strange and exciting new place, Renay can experience for the first time what it is to have everything she needs for herself and her little girl. The rules here are different—often confusing and sometimes troubling—but in Terry’s home, and in Terry’s arms, Renay can be who she truly is . . . and be loved with caring tenderness and respect. Yet the storm clouds of her previous life still threaten, and Terry’s love alone may not be enough to protect Renay and her little girl from the tragedy that looms on the horizon.
    • Splendora by Edward Swift

      Splendora

      Edward Swift

      The new librarian in the tiny town of Splendora, Texas, has a big secret
      A stunning and stylish femme fatale named Miss Jessie Gatewood has arrived in the dusty hamlet of Splendora. Miss Jessie is the new town librarian—but she has much bigger plans than just shelving books. She intends to give the town and its people a much-needed makeover. But even as she is influencing the fashion sense of the local ladies—and winning the heart of the lovesick Brother Leggett, Splendora’s Baptist minister—a surprising plan for vengeance occupies the fabulous Miss Gatewood’s mind.
      In Edward Swift’s provocative, hilarious first novel, a small town is turned upside down by a new arrival—and a shocking return.
    • The Confessions of Danny Slocum by George Whitmore

      The Confessions of Danny Slocum

      George Whitmore

       

      The witty and intimate story of a young man’s search for fulfillment during the cultural and sexual revolution of 1970s New York City
      Danny Slocum is a gay man in New York at a time of unprecedented sexual freedom. And yet Danny hasn’t had a satisfying encounter with another man in years, a plight that drives him to sex therapy. Virgil, Danny’s therapist, suggests that Danny work with another man, Joe, who has a similar problem, in the hopes that they can work out their anxieties together. The arrangement brings memories of Danny’s bygone relationships bubbling to the surface as he searches his past for where exactly things went wrong, coming to the realization that perhaps what he craves, above all else, is to be whole.
      Part novel and part memoir, The Confessions of Danny Slocum is a heartfelt, deeply relatable look at sex, love, happiness, and their painful reverse.

       

    • Nightswimmer by Joseph Olshan

      Nightswimmer

      Joseph Olshan

      In this brilliant literary mosaic centered around a love affair, acclaimed novelist Joseph Olshan explores the intense pressures and passions of gay life in New York City during the AIDS epidemic
      Ten years ago, Will Kaplan and his lover went for a night swim in the Pacific Ocean—but only Will emerged. In the decade that followed, Will relocated to the other end of the continent, filling his days with shallow and pointless affairs, unable to come to terms with the bizarre disappearance that could have been a tragic drowning, a well-planned abandonment, or both. While immersing himself in New York’s gay bar and disco scene, and a hedonistic Fire Island culture darkened by the grim specter of AIDS, Will meets Sean Paris, a young man as tortured and damaged by the past as Will himself. Drawn together by mutual doubts, needs, secrets, and obsessions, the intense relationship that they form will make waves in their circles of friends and ex-lovers, transforming Will’s life forever.
    • Five Minutes in Heaven by Lisa Alther

      Five Minutes in Heaven

      Lisa Alther

      A wise and funny novel about the kind of love that extends beyond boundaries—within this world and into the next

      Raised in the Tennessee hills in the 1950s by a widower father, Jude grows into a young woman who finds her soul mate in her new neighbor Molly. But when age and social convention intervene, she must find a new person to entrust with her heart. Venturing north to pursue all that ’60s New York has to offer, Jude finds comfort in her childhood pal Sandy, a man now in the midst of his own metamorphosis. Will she give her love to Sandy, or will the attractive and mysterious poet Anna be her true match? With an endearing heroine and a keen understanding of the human condition, Alther’s smart and captivating tale considers how changing views on what it means to love—and be loved—can alter lives. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Lisa Alther, including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
    • Gossip by Christopher Bram

      A gripping thriller about contemporary gay politics

      Ralph Eckhart, an unassuming bookstore manager in the East Village, meets Bill O’Connor online and they agree to get together during Ralph’s weekend visit to Washington, DC. The two start a heated, long-distance sexual relationship. But Ralph discovers that Bill is a closeted Republican journalist, whose new book trashes liberal women in Washington—including Ralph’s speechwriter friend, Nancy—and angrily breaks off the affair. When Bill is found murdered, Ralph becomes the prime suspect. This is a complex psychological and political thriller full of the sexy excitement of “sleeping with the enemy.”

    • Gossip by Christopher Bram

      A gripping thriller about contemporary gay politics

      Ralph Eckhart, an unassuming bookstore manager in the East Village, meets Bill O’Connor online and they agree to get together during Ralph’s weekend visit to Washington, DC. The two start a heated, long-distance sexual relationship. But Ralph discovers that Bill is a closeted Republican journalist, whose new book trashes liberal women in Washington—including Ralph’s speechwriter friend, Nancy—and angrily breaks off the affair. When Bill is found murdered, Ralph becomes the prime suspect. This is a complex psychological and political thriller full of the sexy excitement of “sleeping with the enemy.”

    • Hold Tight by Christopher Bram

      Hold Tight

      Christopher Bram

      A World War II sailor works in a New York City brothel—for his country
      After being arrested in a gay brothel in New York during a raid, Seaman Second Class Hank Fayette doesn’t understand why his homosexual activities are grounds for imprisonment. The brothel is rumored to be a hangout for Nazi spies and the Navy forces Hank to go undercover as a prostitute. They hope to use clandestine sexuality to retrieve clandestine intelligence. However, after Hank becomes friendly with a black teenager named Juke, nothing seems to go as planned. Hold Tight is a World War II thriller set in the Big Band era, a world where sexuality and race can be equally dangerous.
    • In Memory of Angel Clare by Christopher Bram

      In Memory of Angel Clare

      Christopher Bram

      A group of worldly New Yorkers inherit a friend’s last lover

      A year after the AIDS-related death of filmmaker Clarence Laird, known to friends as Angel Clare, his young boyfriend, Michael, is still in deep mourning. Clarence’s older, sophisticated friends—male and female, gay and straight—find themselves the custodians of Michael, a callow kid they never liked much to begin with. What follows is a dark, intimate comedy about real grief and false grief, misunderstanding, friendship, love, and forgiveness.

    • Riverfinger Women by Elana Dykewomon

      Riverfinger Women

      Elana Dykewomon

      Award-winning author Elana Dykewomon’s powerful debut novel about lesbian life in America during the social upheaval of the late 1960s and early 1970s

      Written when she was just twenty-four years old, Riverfinger Women is Elana Dykewomon’s beloved, intimate coming-of-age novel about Inez and her circle of friends—the Riverfinger women—struggling to find themselves amid the changing social mores of the Civil Rights era. Inez has known she was a lesbian since childhood, and while moving between Highland, her boarding school, and her friends’ Greenwich Village apartment, she experiences longing and disappointment, friendship and romance, and her first real relationship, with schoolmate Abby. Along with their experimental and outgoing friend Peggy, Inez and Abby graduate from Highland and move into adulthood, confronting the prejudices of the larger world as they go.

      Told in an engrossing interweaving narrative, Riverfinger Women explores the characters’ brushes with sexual violence, prostitution, drugs, love, and, ultimately, happiness amid the thrills and challenges of lesbian life during the second women’s liberation movement.

    • All American Boy by William J. Mann

      All American Boy

      William J. Mann

      A gay man who fled his hometown in a cloud of scandal and guilt returns home to his estranged family—and the boy he left behind

      The first call is from Wally Day’s estranged mother, begging him to come home. The second is from Sebastian Garafolo, a Brown’s Mill cop Wally last spoke to when he confessed to having underage sex in the old apple orchard. Today, Garafolo is calling about something else entirely: Wally’s cousin Kyle is missing.

      Twenty years ago, Wally fled his hometown in shame. He returns to a place that has barely changed, where he knows who walks the streets by day and who comes out at night. Now, as circumstances force him to confront the events that drove him to leave who he was far behind, Wally must also face dark truths about his family . . . about a shattering night and a crime that still haunts him and shaped the man he has become. If he has any hope of embracing the future, he must first make peace with his past.

      All American Boy is a stunning novel about forbidden love, forgiveness, and hard-won redemption.
    • The Men from the Boys by William J. Mann

      The Men from the Boys

      William J. Mann

      This classic novel by bestselling author William J. Mann features a gay man trying to come to terms with sex, friendship, aging, and falling—and staying—in love

      This stunning slice of gay life at the turn of the millennium introduces thirtysomething Jeff O’Brien. After six years, his lover, Lloyd, has just announced that the passion between them has died. Terrified of ending up alone, Jeff turns his eye toward other men. But the anonymous, impersonal encounters leave him feeling sordid and used. In search of love during this “last summer in which I am to be young,” he finds romance with a beautiful houseboy named Eduardo. At twenty-two, Eduardo is the same age Jeff was when he began a relationship with the older David Javitz, a leading activist now gravely ill with AIDS. But David became more than a lover to Jeff, who wasn’t yet out of the closet. He was his mentor and cherished friend.

      Narrated by Jeff, who’s caught between the baby boomers and generation X, the novel shuttles between summers in Provincetown and winters in Boston. The Men from the Boys is about the illusive nature of love and desire—“the magic that happens across a dance floor,” leaving you “forever young.”
    • Where the Boys Are by William J. Mann

      Where the Boys Are

      William J. Mann

      Jeff O’Brien and his friends return in this sequel to The Men from the Boys, William J. Mann’s critically acclaimed debut novel about gay love and friendship

      Where the Boys Are opens in Manhattan on New Year’s Eve, 1999. With the world on the cusp of the new millennium, Jeff O’Brien and his ex-lover Lloyd Griffith are grieving the loss of their friend and mentor David Javitz to AIDS. Desperate to forget, Jeff has become a fixture on the dance floor, surrounding himself with ever-younger boy toys like Henry Weiner. Henry, who was an insurance-company geek until Jeff transformed him into a hottie with washboard abs, is secretly in love with Jeff, who’s got a thing for the mysterious and exotic Anthony Sabe. Lloyd, once the love of Jeff’s life, has left his job to run a B&B with widow Eva Horner.

      Alternately narrated by Jeff, Lloyd, and Henry, Where the Boys Are is a high-octane trek through the gay party-circuit scene from Provincetown to San Francisco, Montreal to Palm Springs. With equal parts humor and pathos, it addresses universal issues of commitment, family, friendship, and the never-ending search for love that everyone can relate to, whether gay or straight, male or female.
    • Forth into Light by Gordon Merrick

      Forth into Light

      Gordon Merrick

      In the final chapter of the bestselling epic love story of Peter and Charlie, the two men are forced to fight for their relationship like never before

      For two men with the looks of Adonis and Narcissus, it’s no surprise that Greece was the destination for a romantic getaway. Once there, however, the two men fall into the beds of others, with the duplicitous Martha striving to steal Charlie away from Peter after he has a moment of infidelity.

      For the final installment of the Peter & Charlie Trilogy, Gordon Merrick widens his focus on the couple to include the village in which they’re staying, creating a web of deceit and lust that comes to a head in unexpected and satisfying ways, while the love between Peter and Charlie is tested repeatedly with the emergence of a passionate young man named Jeff. The bond between these two has spanned the years and the globe, but it could well meet its end here on the lush Greek shores.
    • The Good Life by Gordon Merrick

      The Good Life

      Gordon Merrick

      When marriage gets in the way of attraction, something’s got to give

      Perry Langham grew up an outsider looking in. He wanted to join Manhattan high society, be invited to those parties, wear those clothes, and drive those cars. He is a man with only one endowment, and he pledges to use it to achieve his dream by any means necessary. He finally gets the opportunity he has always wanted when he is swept into the world of millionaire Billy Vernon—a place where anything seems possible.

      In order to keep the fun going, Perry marries Billy’s beautiful young daughter Bettina. And that’s when the wheels fall off. Billy can’t reconcile his attraction to young men with his new marriage, and he goes down a dark path from which there may be no return.

      Based on the true story of a high-society murder case that drew international attention to its story of shocking crime and outrageous sex, The Good Life is Gordon Merrick’s posthumous final novel, cowritten with his partner, Charles G. Hulse—a fitting cap to an illustrious career.
    • The Great Urge Downward by Gordon Merrick

      The Great Urge Downward

      Gordon Merrick

      After fleeing his past, one man finds that the present has its own dangers

      For Lance, things always came easily. With looks to die for and a family fortune propping up everything he did, he tended to come out on top, no matter the circumstances. He had it all: a perfect marriage and a distinguished career in the navy—and the notoriety that came with it. But it all fell apart when his true desires came out and drove him down a self-destructive path to the small Central American town of Puerto Veragua.

      Here he takes whatever and whomever he wishes, living a life devoted solely to cheap thrills, pleasure, and desire. However, when Robbie Cosling, a young man with a past of his own, arrives, they create a love that will change both men’s lives forever.

      The sequel to Perfect Freedom, The Great Urge Downward continues Robbie Cosling’s journey of discovery and love as he learns he must risk it all in order to have a shot at true passion.
    • An Idol for Others by Gordon Merrick

      An Idol for Others

      Gordon Merrick

      From the New York Times–bestselling author of The Lord Won’t Mind comes the story of a man whose marriage of convenience will never keep him from taking what he truly wants

      Before he has even hit his twentieth birthday, Walter Makin has already earned a red-hot career on the stage and a reputation as a Boy Wonder. From afar, he is truly a man who has the whole world at its knees and a bright future ahead of him. Still, he has one weakness—other boys.

      Set in the 1940s, An Idol for Others follows Walter’s internal turmoil as he tries to follow society’s norms by marrying Clara, a wealthy, forceful heiress who is as enamored of Walter’s status as she is of his body. In spite of Walter’s efforts to refuse what he truly wants, he finds comfort again and again in the beds of other men—men who understand themselves and what they want in ways Walter can only dream of. However, when he meets and falls for a beautiful young writer, he can’t deny who he is any longer. Now he must tell the world, regardless of the consequences.
    • The Lord Won't Mind by Gordon Merrick

      The Lord Won't Mind

      Gordon Merrick

      The classic gay love story that spent sixteen weeks on the New York Times bestseller list is as gripping and sexy today as it was when it hit the bookshelves more than forty years ago

      Charlie Mills always played the role of the good grandson, and his grandmother rewarded him for it handsomely in the form of all the gifts, money, and attention a boy could want. Entering college in the late 1930s, Charlie just has to keep doing what his grandmother expects of him in order to continue to receive her gifts. He has to find a nice girl, get married, and have a few kids. Then one summer, he meets Peter Martin.

      Peter is everything that Charlie has ever wanted. Despite all the obstacles, Charlie immediately craves and pursues Peter, who happily obliges him. As they grow closer, Charlie is forced to choose between two options: complying with the expectations of society and family, or following the call of true love. In this, the first book of the Charlie & Peter Trilogy, Gordon Merrick creates an enduring portrait of two young men deeply in love, and the tribulations they endure to express themselves and maintain their relationship.
    • Now Let's Talk About Music by Gordon Merrick

      Now Let's Talk About Music

      Gordon Merrick

      On a steamy trip to Bangkok, anything can happen, and a man can be whoever he wants to be

      In order to get away from a stream of meaningless flings, Gerry heads to the Far East, down to the sweltering shores of Bangkok, to get some time for himself. He’s searching for a love that is truly real—one that will last. When he receives a cordial invitation written on heavily crested stationery, he is thrust into a passionate journey from which there will be no recovery.

      The sender of the invitation is international playboy and gossip-paper fixture Ernst von Hallers. Born to a family of incredibly rich industrialists, Ernst cuts a truly dashing figure. Traveling the world on his boat, with a collection of attractive young men at his call, Ernst represents everything Gerry is not, while acting the part of someone Gerry wishes he could be. When Ernst brings Gerry into his life, both men must look within themselves and each other to truly see what pleasure and love are.
    • One for the Gods by Gordon Merrick

      One for the Gods

      Gordon Merrick

      In the follow-up to the gay romance bestseller The Lord Won’t Mind, Peter and Charlie’s marriage is put to the test when a young Frenchman enters their lives

      After a decade together in a steady, happy relationship, a trip to the sun-baked Mediterranean is exactly what Peter and Charlie need. Peter, now an art dealer, and Charlie, an artist, travel to the Riviera to attend to some business. However, once there, they meet a man who pushes their fidelity to the breaking point—and past it.

      In this, the second novel of the bestselling Peter & Charlie Trilogy, Gordon Merrick picks up with the couple’s lives a few years after The Lord Won’t Mind and in smart and scintillating fashion explores the ways the years can twist and warp a relationship. When their trip continues on a yacht through the Greek islands, Peter creates what he hopes is a good plan to mend their cracked bond, but instead may have created something that will rip them apart forever.
    • Perfect Freedom by Gordon Merrick

      Perfect Freedom

      Gordon Merrick

      St. Tropez offers all the pleasures a growing boy could want—as well as all the danger

      After the Wall Street crash and the onset of the Great Depression, Stuart Cosling wants something different than his typical American life, so he takes his sizable fortune and a beautiful young French trophy wife, and moves to the undiscovered paradise of St. Tropez. Here he has the home, the vineyard, and the precocious son he has always wanted. Within a few years, his status on the island grows from that of new arrival to local celebrity.

      Their son, Robbie, grows up. By his teenage years, he has become a terribly handsome man, and while on a cruise, he learns the pleasures that manhood can bring. Now Robbie is impelled to chase that feeling and try to find the love that he deserves.

      Perfect Freedom has all the hallmarks of Gordon Merrick’s finest work: scenic locales, beautifully rendered characters, and outrageous emotion oozing from every page.
    • The Quirk by Gordon Merrick

      The Quirk

      Gordon Merrick

      Sometimes feelings that you think you shouldn’t have are more than just a quirk

      Rod has thrown himself into the life of the bohemian Parisian painter. His output as an artist flows readily from his brush as he breezes through brief dalliances with women on the Left Bank, seeking pleasure and satisfaction before anything else.

      Rod has his youth, his money, his art, and an active sex life—everything he could want. At least, he thinks so. Until he meets an attractive male model who will forever change him and the way he thinks about love. At first, Rod assumes their trysts are simply a quirk, a twist on the rendezvous he has had with girls throughout his time in Paris. However, as they spend more and more time together, Rod realizes that this feeling isn’t a quirk: It’s who he truly is.
    • Afterlife by Paul Monette

      Afterlife

      Paul Monette

      A powerful exploration of the way AIDS reshapes relationships and lives

      Afterlife is a haunting and unforgettable story of men facing loss and seeking love, movingly capturing the moment in the 1980s when the AIDS epidemic was completely devastating the American gay community. Here, National Book Award winner Paul Monette depicts three men of various economic and social backgrounds, all with one thing in common: They are widowers, in a way, and all of their lovers died of AIDS in an LA hospital within a week of one another.

      Steven, Sonny, and Dell meet weekly to discuss how to go on with their lives despite the hanging sword of being HIV positive. One tries to find a semblance of normalcy; one rebels openly against the disease, choosing to treat his body as a temple that he can consecrate and desecrate at will; and one throws himself into fierce political activism. No matter what path each one takes, they are all searching for one thing: a way to live and love again.

      Afterlife finds Paul Monette at his most autobiographical, portraying men in a situation that he himself experienced, and one that he described to critical acclaim in the award-winning Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.
    • Halfway Home by Paul Monette

      Halfway Home

      Paul Monette

      Tom tried everything to get away from the world—but it had a way of getting back to him

      When Tom was diagnosed with AIDS, he thought of it as a death sentence. His life was effectively over. He packed up everything and moved to a beach house in California. There, he could live out what remained of his life in peace. His landlord was kind, understanding—and interested in him romantically. Tom had found the safe haven he sought. That is, until his brother, Brian, reappeared in his life.

      Brian’s shady business connections back home have him and his family on the run. With him are his homophobic wife, Susan, and his son, Daniel, who has never met his uncle. Thrown into an explosive situation, Tom and his family struggle to become closer. But when Brian’s dirty dealings follow him to California and threaten the lives of the entire family, the bond between the two brothers is put to the test.

      Paul Monette displays a keen awareness of family dynamics as he explores coming out, life-threatening illness, and the lifelong consequences of brotherly conflicts. Halfway Home is a novel about anger and reconciliation, love and danger.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.
    • Lightfall by Paul Monette

      Lightfall

      Paul Monette

      In the village of Pitts Landing, true evil can linger for centuries

      It all started with the desperate urging of an internal voice, born from a pulse-pounding nightmare: Run. With that, Iris Ammons felt impelled to leave behind her husband, her children, her job, and her idyllic life. Her motive was never clear to her, just a notion that her entire life had become unfamiliar and that she had to get to the West Coast and the mystical village of Pitts Landing.

      Similarly focused on the town is its devilishly charismatic cult leader Michael Roman. Michael cuts a bloody swath through his followers in order to get to the secret at the heart of the village.

      As the coincidences pile up and the omens stack on top of one another like the bodies of Michael’s disciples, he and Iris find themselves at the center of a mystery that stretches back for generations and has effects that could be felt for centuries to come.

      Lightfall is an erotic horror epic from gifted National Book Award winner Paul Monette, a master of combining thrills with intense emotion, no matter what the genre.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.
    • Taking Care of Mrs. Carroll by Paul Monette

      Taking Care of Mrs. Carroll

      Paul Monette

      Now that Mrs. Carroll has died, the race for control of her elegant home has begun

      It is incredible how the death of a loved one can bring people together. Especially when greedy developers waste no time in attempting to steal the Cape Cod estate of the person in question.

      Before she could add a stipulation to her will requiring that the house not be bought up and razed for development, Mrs. Carroll tragically passed away. Now, it is up to her lover, Phidias, and her houseboy, David, to take care of the place once again. However, they cannot do it alone. They will need the help of people ranging from David’s ex-boyfriend Rick to a kitschy former screen goddess.

      Written not long after Paul Monette moved to Los Angeles, his first novel is a madcap caper featuring a cast of characters willing to do anything to fulfill a dying woman’s final wish—even if that means impersonating her while hiding her dead body from the nosy lawyers scouring her estate.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.
    • After the Fire by Jane Rule

      After the Fire

      Jane Rule

      Five women at critical crossroads in their lives come together in this gem of a novel set on an island off the coast of Vancouver

      After the Fire introduces a quintet of very different women as they struggle with abandonment, loss, and new beginnings—both together and alone.

      There is Karen Tasuki, who recently separated from her partner and wonders if she’ll ever get used to being alone . . . until she befriends Red, who cleans houses for the island’s privileged inhabitants. Miss James is the eccentric Southern spinster born at the turn of the century. Milly Forbes is a woman whose husband “went scot free after stealing twenty years of her life.” And the sensible Henrietta “Hen” Hawkins yearns for her absent, ill husband.

      On a rural island that they dub a “used-wife lot,” the five heroines nurture one another as they cope with loneliness, death, and renewed life. Imbued with wit and compassion, After the Fire is a novel about women loving women and women helping women—and the bond that transcends age, race, and even gender.

    • Against the Season by Jane Rule

      Against the Season

      Jane Rule

      Jane Rule’s incandescent third novel explores love, loss, and family . . . and the pieces of ourselves we leave behind

      Born lame, Amelia Larson lives in the house that has been in her family for generations. Now she has a decision to make: Should she honor the dying wish of her sister, Beatrice, to burn her diaries? There are sixty-nine in all: one journal for each year of Beatrice’s life since the age of six.

      Beginning in 1913 and traversing World War I and beyond, the diaries become a moving counterpoint to Amelia’s life as they unpeel layers of family history. As the past starts to impinge on the present, her relations—then and now—come to vivid life.

      Told from alternating points of view, Against the Season opens an illuminating window into small-town life. As the sins and secrets of a family are revealed through the sometimes-faulty lens of memory, it is a story about the seasons of life and the ties that bind us even beyond death.

    • Contract with the World by Jane Rule

      Contract with the World

      Jane Rule

      Told as a series of interconnected stories, Jane Rule’s fifth novel—offering six characters’ shifting perspectives—takes us to a place where feminism, creativity, and sexual politics collide
      Contract with the World
      follows a group of friends, artists, and lovers as they negotiate the shifting terrain of the 1970s—a time when gay and lesbian politics were just emerging. Divided into six parts, the novel enters a world marked by desire, ambition, jealousy, and love. We follow these sexually adventurous thirty-something friends as they marry, divorce, take lovers, lose love, and never stop searching for personal and artistic fulfillment. Whether gay, straight, or bisexual, Rule’s characters are as much a product of the era that defines them as of the wise and foolhardy choices they make in their own turbulent lives—choices that will have inevitable, sometimes tragic consequences.
    • A Hot-Eyed Moderate by Jane Rule

      A Hot-Eyed Moderate

      Jane Rule

      The essays in this inspiring collection analyze the craft of writing and the art of living and loving

      Jane Rule shares her insights into the creative process, sexual fidelity, feminist politics, and the transformative power of love. Part I—“On Writing”—dispenses advice (writing is “a craft that has to be practiced”); offers observations (“The creative process in any art takes time”); and dissects the writer-publisher relationship, both feminist and traditional. Part II—“Writing for the Gay Press”—discusses, among other things, what it means to be a lesbian writer.

      With chapters like “The Myth of Genital Jealousy” and “You Cannot Judge a Pumpkin’s Happiness by the Smile Upon Its Face,” this collection shatters common myths such as why you should always write about what you know. There are also moving pieces about Rule’s grandmother, artists who have influenced Rule, and what it is to be human and female in your time.

      From censorship to morality in literature to how men and women can live together in peace, A Hot-Eyed Moderate is Jane Rule at her provocative best.

    • Inland Passage by Jane Rule

      Inland Passage

      Jane Rule

      The stories in this remarkable collection by Jane Rule explore the relationships among men and women, women and women, and families—both conventional and unconventional

      From traditional families to relationships that break new ground, this anthology runs the gamut of human emotions.

      The eponymous heroine “Dulce” is a self-proclaimed muse, witch, whore, “preying lesbian,” and “devouring mother” who has a profound effect on the lives of the women and men around her. “His Nor Hers” tracks the unraveling of a marriage—with unexpected results. “The Real World” explores the moral universe of a female mechanic who creates an unconventional family. In “A Matter of Numbers,” a divorced math professor falls in love with her twenty-year-old student. And the title story introduces two women—one widowed, one divorced—who rediscover romance aboard a cruise ship.

      Whether she’s turning the spotlight on unfulfilled wives, frustrated husbands, friends, or secret lovers, Inland Passage is Jane Rule at her most insightful.

    • Lesbian Images by Jane Rule

      Lesbian Images

      Jane Rule

      Jane Rule’s fourth book explores lesbianism as portrayed by authors from Gertrude Stein to Colette, from Vita Sackville-West to May Sarton and Willa Cather

      Lesbian Images opens with a disclaimer from the author: “This book is not intended to be a comprehensive literary or cultural history of lesbians.” Rather, as Jane Rule goes on to tell us, her goal is to present her own attitudes and measure them against the images of lesbianism as depicted by other female authors. Thus, chapters titled “Gertrude Stein 1874–1946,” “Willa Cather 1876–1947,” and “Ivy Compton-Burnett 1892–1969,” among many others, reveal how the concept of love between women can be filtered through one’s personal experiences and perceptions.

      There are also chapters about lesbian myths and morality; the effect of the women’s movement on lesbianism; the inherent conflicts between lesbianism and feminism; how Radclyffe Hall’s The Well of Loneliness changed fifteen-year-old Rule’s life; and what it means to be labeled a lesbian writer.

      At once astute and nonjudgmental, Lesbian Images is a deeply engaging work that sounds a powerful note of hope for the future.

    • Memory Board by Jane Rule

      Memory Board

      Jane Rule

      Memory—and the tenuousness of life—is the theme of this deeply moving novel by Jane Rule

      When the novel opens, Diana’s twin brother, David, a widower in his mid-sixties, is looking back on his life. As memories swamp him, he decides to take a critical step: to beg for his sister’s forgiveness.

      Diana has never met David’s two daughters. She has no idea how many grandchildren he has. David doesn’t know Diana’s longtime lover, Constance, housebound by advancing memory loss and for whom Diana writes the day’s events on an erasable board to help her keep track of a life that’s slipping away. Estranged for nearly forty years, David appears at Diana’s dinner table, throwing her life into turmoil. But as she and her brother begin to rediscover each other, they both find the strength to move on with their lives.

      Told in Diana and David’s alternating points of view, Memory Board makes a powerful case for living in the present and making every moment count.

    • Outlander by Jane Rule

      Outlander

      Jane Rule

      Fiction and nonfiction form compelling counterpoints in this powerful look at love and lesbianism

      The stories and essays in this anthology depict homosexuality in all its variegated forms.

      In “Home Movie,” Alysoun Carr, a clarinetist with the San Francisco Symphony, learns about overcoming fear from a woman named Constantina. “In the Attic of the House” depicts sixty-five-year-old Alice, who rents rooms to younger gay women who have no inkling of Alice’s tragic lesbian past. “Outlander” is about a widowed alcoholic trying to stay sober through a war that will take her son and, possibly, her longtime lover. “Sexuality in Literature” is a lively essay about everything from the homophobia that exists in all of us to the new words that need to be invented for female sexuality.

    • This Is Not for You by Jane Rule

      This Is Not for You

      Jane Rule

      Jane Rule’s second novel follows a group of friends through New York and abroad as they explore the freedoms—and limitations—of sexuality in a time of stifling social convention

      Katherine George—Kate to her intimates—is captain of her high school debating and swimming teams. But beneath her high-achieving exterior is a young woman on a quest for meaning and fulfilling relationships.

      Through her decades-long correspondence with Esther, the woman with whom she falls passionately in love, Kate shares the story of her journey into womanhood. As the sexually repressed fifties gives way to the liberated sixties, Kate’s odyssey takes her further and further from home. This Is Not for You also chronicles the travails of Kate’s intimate circle of friends as they, too, come to terms with their sexuality. Years pass before Kate writes her last letter, and can finally let go and move on.

      Reissued decades after it first appeared, this is a cathartic, unforgettable novel about the search for identity, intimacy, and love.

    • The Education of Harriet Hatfield by May Sarton

      The Education of Harriet Hatfield

      May Sarton

      After her lover of thirty years dies, a Boston woman opens a bookstore for her neighborhood, an endeavor that forces her to confront her past while she rebuilds her future

      Over the course of their thirty-year relationship, Vicky and Harriet fell into a predictable cadence: Vicky took the lead while Harriet was content to follow. When Vicky dies, Harriet is lost and in search of an identity that was subsumed by that of her partner for three decades. Lying awake in bed one evening, Harriet has an idea—a women’s bookstore for the residents of her blue-collar Boston neighborhood, where people can gather, talk, and buy great books. Using her inheritance from Vicky, Harriet begins her next great adventure, opening not only the store but also herself to whatever may come. But while some in the community thrill at the idea of her bookstore, others attack—using graffiti and hate mail to express their prejudice against what they perceive to be an invasion of their neighborhood by “filthy gay men and lesbians.” Against this newfound scrutiny and intolerance, Harriet must come to terms not only with the world her privilege had insulated her from, but with what it means to go without fear of labels or discrimination in pursuit of a fuller life.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • Mrs. Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing by May Sarton

      Mrs. Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing

      May Sarton

      Sarton’s most important novel tells the story of a poet in her seventies, whose life is retold episodically during an interview with two writers from a literary magazine

      Hilary Stevens’s prolific career includes a provocative novel that shot her into the public consciousness years ago, and an oeuvre of poetry that more recently has consigned her to near-obscurity. Now in the twilight of her life, Hilary, who is both a feminist and a lesbian, is receiving renewed attention for an upcoming collection of poems, one that has brought two young reporters to her Cape Cod home. As Hilary prepares for the conversation, she recalls formative moments both large and small. She then embarks on the interview itself—a witty and intelligent discussion of her life, work, and romantic relationships with men and women. After the journalists have left, Hilary helps a visiting male friend with his anxiety over being gay and imparts wisdom about channeling his own creative passions.

      This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.
    • The Demon by Hubert Selby Jr.
      A womanizer’s struggle for self-control spirals into crime, madness, and murder
      Harry White grew up in blue-collar Brooklyn, but the young man’s charm, smarts, and good looks have helped him earn a place as an uptown junior executive. White’s gifts have also made his love life easy, and he takes special pleasure in seducing married women. But when “Harry the Lover” is ready to grow up and leave his womanizing behind, White finds that suppressing his libido has dangerous consequences. His attempts at restraint awaken something sinister, causing White to seek excitement in a new form of violence and depravity. Shocking and enthralling, The Demon is an unflinching meditation on male vanity by one of the most acclaimed and original writers of the twentieth century. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Hubert Selby Jr. including rare photos from the author’s estate.
    • Last Exit to Brooklyn by Hubert Selby Jr.

      Last Exit to Brooklyn

      Hubert Selby Jr.

       

      “An extraordinary achievement . . . a vision of hell so stern it cannot be chuckled or raged aside.”—The New York Times Book Review
      A classic of postwar American literature, Last Exit to Brooklyn created shock waves upon its release in 1964 with its raw, vibrant language and startling revelations of New York City’s underbelly. The prostitutes, drunks, addicts, and johns of Selby’s Brooklyn are fierce and lonely creatures, desperately searching for a moment of transcendence amidst the decay and brutality of the waterfront—though none have any real hope of escape. Last Exit to Brooklyn offers a disturbing yet hauntingly sensitive portrayal of American life, and nearly fifty years after publication, it stands as a crucial and masterful work of modern fiction. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Hubert Selby Jr. including rare photos from the author’s estate.

       

    • The Black and White of It by Ann Allen Shockley

      The Black and White of It

      Ann Allen Shockley

      A magnificent collection of stories that bravely and honestly explore issues of race, class, sex, love, and being lesbian in America
      Ann Allen Shockley’s work has been widely praised for its honest portrayals of lesbian life, and now the author takes an even closer look at the singular world of women in love. But the stories that make up The Black and White of It address much more than simply the female gay experience: They cast a brilliant light on race issues and prejudice, on the emotional barriers that divide women and men, on the polarizing distinctions of class and culture, and on family as a force for both good and ill.
      These are powerful stories of love and desire, intolerance and denial. Here, a bright, vivacious young coed attempts to bring light and love back into the sad life of a lonely middle-aged English professor. An ambitious African American congresswoman refuses to admit the truth about her sexuality, thereby jeopardizing her very special—and secret—relationship with her devoted female assistant. Shockley plunges the reader into the eye of the storm when a gay black woman brings her white lover home to meet the family on Thanksgiving.
      Whether exploring the ugly, deep-seated prejudice living under the surface of an academic lesbian community, relating the antebellum tale of a southern female plantation owner mesmerized by her newly acquired slave girl, or recalling the sweet, sensual awkwardness of a first date, Ann Allen Shockley writes with unabashed truthfulness, poignancy, and insight. Her stories will long be remembered by gay and straight readers alike.

    • Say Jesus and Come to Me by Ann Allen Shockley

      Say Jesus and Come to Me

      Ann Allen Shockley

      The physical and emotional attraction a charismatic black female evangelist feels for a beautiful but damaged blues singer grows into a powerful, sensual love in a southern city rocked by racism, intolerance, and sexual violence

      The traveling minister Reverend Myrtle Black is a proud, strong African American woman, passionately devoted to God, justice, and intimate female contact. Enraged over a brutal assault on two young prostitutes, the good pastor comes to Nashville intending to organize local women in protest over the racism and sexism the city’s officials seem all too eager to ignore. Then, in the course of her crusade, a beautiful, profoundly damaged stranger walks through the church door . . . and turns Myrtle’s life upside down.

      A world-famous rhythm-and-blues singer, Travis Lee has experienced more than her share of pain and heartbreak. Having hit rock bottom—burned out on drugs and stuck in her latest very bad relationship—she comes to Reverend Myrtle seeking the kind of hope and salvation only Jesus can bring. What she experiences instead is a profound and powerful physical and emotional attraction that neither she nor the minister can ignore. But in the media spotlight, in this town where intolerance rules, a love such as theirs is a most dangerous thing, inspiring the hatred and violence of those who would go to any lengths to destroy it.

    • The Waterfront Journals by David Wojnarowicz

      The Waterfront Journals

      David Wojnarowicz

      Voices from the margins of American life tell their sad and shocking stories of trickery, betrayal, sex, and defeat in a poignant and powerful collection of more than forty short monologues

      In his full but regrettably brief lifetime, David Wojnarowicz was many things: a visual and performance artist whose radical work incensed the right-wing establishment, a tireless AIDS and anticensorship activist, and, most emphatically, a writer. His Waterfront Journals are a remarkable collection of fictionalized stories spoken in the voices of unforgettable characters the author met during his time spent living on America’s streets and traveling her back roads. The narrators speak from the heart and from the depths of despair, creating an often shocking and powerfully moving mosaic of American life in the shadows.

      Here are junkies and boy hustlers, truckers and hoboes. A runner tells of his encounter with two drug-using priests who openly and proudly discuss their various sexual exploits. Whores tell of johns who brutalized them and corrupt cops who did the same. A young man relays his tale of a seedy movie balcony pickup and his shocking discovery that his “date” was not who she seemed. Another man describes sex with an amputee Vietnam veteran. Each of their stories stuns with hard and haunting truths that will leave the reader staggered and breathless, and yet exhilarated.
    • The Biograph Girl by William J. Mann

      The Biograph Girl

      William J. Mann

      Award-winning author William J. Mann blends fact and fiction in this unconventional novel about the nature of celebrity

      The Biograph Girl is Florence Lawrence, who gets her first big break in vaudeville as a tiny tot who can whistle like a man. By 1910 she’s a legendary movie star, pursued by thousands of rabid fans. Just a few short decades later, she’s all but forgotten, reduced to walk-ons at MGM. In 1938 she kills herself by ingesting a lethal dose of ant paste.

      Fast-forward fifty-nine years. A 107-year-old woman named Flo Bridgewood is discovered in a Catholic nursing home in Buffalo. Could the feisty chain smoker with the red satin bow in her hair be America’s former sweetheart? Florence Lawrence is dead . . . isn’t she? And if not, then whose body is in her grave? That’s what journalist Richard Sheehan wants to find out as he and his identical twin brother, Ben, a documentary filmmaker, decide to cash in on a decades-old mystery. Sharing the stage is Flo herself, whose story is the stuff of Hollywood fantasy.

      A provocative melding of fact and fiction, The Biograph Girl is about what it means to be a celebrity—then and now.
    • The Gold Diggers by Paul Monette

      The Gold Diggers

      Paul Monette

      Paul Monette’s uproarious, sexy novel takes us deep into the glamorous world of vintage Los Angeles

      Perched on top of a hill in the oldest part of Bel Air, Crook House is the grand mansion that gilded Hollywood dreams are made of. It seemed like the perfect place for the exhausted and neurotic Rita to take time away from her life and catch up with her old friend Peter and his lover, Nick. What she didn’t count on was her friends’ emotional baggage, not to mention the suspicious tales of a buried treasure underneath the house.

      This second novel from Paul Monette puts a tender focus on the ways in which money and time can distort relationships, while also demonstrating how the ties between friends can endure—and even grow stronger—no matter what the distance or history. As Rita, Nick, and Peter get closer to unraveling the mystery buried underneath Crook House, they begin to learn that what they are searching for could be the key to their very survival.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.
    • The Long Shot by Paul Monette

      The Long Shot

      Paul Monette

      An unlikely pair races to find a murderer in the hazy underbelly of Los Angeles

      Vivien Cokes and her husband, Jasper, are LA royalty, and they have the lifestyle to prove it. Big parties, a huge mansion in Malibu, and complicated affairs are all part of the package. However, during a morning swim, Vivien makes a discovery that changes her life forever. Smelling smoke, she sees her home in flames, and inside, she finds her husband dead in the hot tub with his male lover in an apparent double suicide.

      To find out the truth behind her husband’s death, Vivien must turn to the unlikeliest of sources: a failed writer and grifter who was the boyfriend of her husband’s late lover. After finding kinship in a sort of shared widowhood, the two set out to bring to justice the people behind their loved ones’ deaths.

      Paul Monette has a poet’s touch, and his aptitude is on full display in The Long Shot as he immerses readers in a mystery with a cast of characters that is as diverse and memorable as the city in which they live.

      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.
    • Wolverine Cirque by Joseph Olshan

      Wolverine Cirque

      Joseph Olshan

      Wolverine Cirque, one of the steepest and most dangerous ski runs in North America, looms over this original short—a taut, gripping tale of male athleticism and love—by Joseph Olshan
      Sam and Mike, top-notch skiers, hike miles off piste to face a harrowing headwall of snow, a sheer descent that challenges their skill, their endurance, and ultimately, their ability to survive.
      At the center of the story is Sam’s painful and poignant reminiscence of a complicated and doomed love affair with Luc, a Division I soccer player who struggles with his identity and the surprising power of desire finally unleashed. As both men grapple with the intensity of their affection for one another, Sam is forced to reckon that his attempt to master Wolverine Cirque is really a futile effort to stay the arguably more difficult course of his declining youth.
    • Back Where He Started by Jay Quinn

      Back Where He Started

      Jay Quinn

      In Back Where He Started, Chris Thayer finds himself packing up the last pieces of a quietly extraordinary life. After twenty-three years of marriage to Zack Ronan—and after raising the widower’s three kids—Chris finds himself facing an uncertain second act. Seeking refuge in North Carolina’s Outer Banks, Chris has to come to terms with his own empty nest and challenge himself to move forward with a new relationship. This is a subtle depiction of the meaning of family and motherhood, and of the search for your true soul.

      Jay Quinn’s Lambda-nominated novels transcend traditional gay fiction, exploring universal issues of marriage, aging parents, addiction, and attraction, all while presenting unique characters and page-turning drama. Don’t miss any of Quinn’s novels: Metes and Bounds, Back Where He Started, The Good Neighbor, The Beloved Son, and The Boomerang Kid.
    • The Beloved Son by Jay Quinn

      The Beloved Son

      Jay Quinn

      In The Beloved Son, one family must cope with life’s ever-changing moments as two sons are faced with the issue of their aging parents. Karl Preston lives an ideal American life with his wife and daughter in an affluent North Carolina suburb. At his father’s request, Karl travels to Florida for a weekend visit that starts a roller coaster of family drama and heartache. Not only does Karl have to deal with his gay brother, Sven, who is the primary caretaker of their parents, he must also confront his mother’s growing dementia. Richly told, lyrically written, this is a poignant portrait of the modern-day family and how responsibility trumps resentment.

      Jay Quinn’s Lambda-nominated novels transcend traditional gay fiction, exploring universal issues of marriage, aging parents, addiction, and attraction, all while presenting unique characters and page-turning drama. Don’t miss any of Quinn’s novels: Metes and Bounds, Back Where He Started, The Good Neighbor, The Beloved Son, and The Boomerang Kid.
    • The Boomerang Kid by Jay Quinn

      The Boomerang Kid

      Jay Quinn

      In The Boomerang Kid, Maura Ostryder is coming into her own, professionally and privately, as she begins her fifty-first year. Maura has always been the master of her own life and has reared her son, Kai (named for the Hawaiian word for sea) to be the same way. But now a grown Kai has come home, having fled emotional attachments to both a young man and a young woman, bringing with him his addiction to painkillers. Suddenly Maura’s maternal streak is reawakened as she battles to bring Kai back from the brink of self-destruction. Vivid and lyrical, this is an emotional tale of the unbreakable bond between mother and son.

      Jay Quinn’s Lambda-nominated novels transcend traditional gay fiction, exploring universal issues of marriage, aging parents, addiction, and attraction, all while presenting unique characters and page-turning drama. Don’t miss any of Quinn’s novels: Metes and Bounds, Back Where He Started, The Good Neighbor, The Beloved Son, and The Boomerang Kid.
    • The Good Neighbor by Jay Quinn

      The Good Neighbor

      Jay Quinn

      In The Good Neighbor, Rory Fallon is walking his dog along the streets of the exclusive Venetian Vistas neighborhood when he notices activity at the house next door. New neighbors have arrived in the form of Austin and Meg Harden, along with their two children. Before long, the Hardens and Rory and his partner, Bruno, have formed a strange, sometimes symbiotic relationship, bringing up questions of love and marriage, trust and temptation. Reflecting our changing social fabric, the unfolding drama reveals that fences exist for a reason, and that when you cross them the consequences can often have confounding results.

      Jay Quinn’s Lambda-nominated novels transcend traditional gay fiction, exploring universal issues of marriage, aging parents, addiction, and attraction, all while presenting unique characters and page-turning drama. Don’t miss any of Quinn’s novels: Metes and Bounds, Back Where He Started, The Good Neighbor, The Beloved Son, and The Boomerang Kid.
    • Metes and Bounds by Jay Quinn

      Metes and Bounds

      Jay Quinn

      “Quinn is a masterful writer of dialogue, lacing his characters’ speech with dry humor and honest, if often unflinching words.”
      --The Bloomsbury Review

      Jay Quinn’s Lambda-nominated novels transcend the traditional gay novel, exploring universal issues of marriage, aging parents, addiction, and attraction, all while presenting unique characters and page-turning drama.

      In METES AND BOUNDS, surf, sand, and sex meet in the macho world of construction workers. For narrator Matt, “the greatest comfort of surfing comes in the sureness and instinct.” Matt is not just coming of age, he’s coming out, and in the sun-bleached world of the North Carolina beaches his burgeoning sexuality can toss as many curves as a wave. Through his longings and self-discovery, Matt knows he cannot let others triumph over being the man he knows to be. As he says, “Being a surfer meant you got out, faced your own fears, and did it.” So too does Matt, in this stirring, memorable novel.

      "Jay Quinn is a worthy successor to such phenomenal Southern writers as Eudora Welty, William Faulkner, Jim Grimsley, and Dorothy Allison. The beauty of his prose and the strength of his characters are apparent from the first sentence. This book is a sheer joy to read."--Lambda Book Report

      Don’t miss any of Jay Quinn’s novels from E-Reads: Metes and Bounds, Back Where He Started, The Good Neighbor, The Beloved Son, and The Boomerang Kid
    • Tales of Nevèrÿon by Samuel R. Delany

      Tales of Nevèrÿon

      Samuel R. Delany

      On the edge of history, civilization emerges from chaos
      A boy of the bustling, colorful docks of port Kolhari, during a political coup, fifteen-year-old Gorgik, once his parents are killed, is taken a slave and transported to the government obsidian mines at the foot of the Faltha mountains. When, in the savagely primitive land of Nevèrÿon, finally he wins his freedom, Gorgik is ready to lead a rebellion against the rulers of this barely civilized land. His is the through-story that, now in the background, now in the foreground, connects these first five stories, in Tales of Nevèrÿon—and, indeed, all the eleven stories, novellas, and novels that comprise Delany’s epic fantasy series, Return to Nevèrÿon, where we can watch civilization first develop money, writing, labor, and that grounding of all civilizations since: capital itself.
      In these sagas of barbarism, new knowledge, and sex, you’ll find far more than in most sword-and-sorcery. They are an epic feat of language, an ironic analysis of the foundations of civilization, and a reminder that no weapon is more powerful than a well-honed legend.
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Samuel R. Delany including rare images from his early career.
    • Neveryóna by Samuel R. Delany

      Neveryóna

      Samuel R. Delany

      In this novel of Nevèrÿon, a girl takes off on a dragon’s back for an adventure of amazement and wonder
      One of the few in Nevèrÿon who can read and write, pryn has saddled a wild dragon and taken off from a mountain ledge. Self-described as an adventurer, warrior, and thief, in her journey pryn will meet plotting merchants, sinister aristocrats, half-mad villagers, and a storyteller who claims to have invented writing itself. The land of Nevèrÿon is mired in a civil war over slavery, and pryn will also find herself—for a while—fighting alongside Gorgik the Liberator, from whom she will learn the cunning she needs as she journeys further and further south in search of a sunken city; for at history’s dawn, some dangers even dragons cannot protect you from.
      The second volume in Samuel R. Delany’s Return to Nevèrÿon cycle, Neveryóna is the longer of its two full-length novels. (The other is The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals.) An intriguing meditation on the power of language, the rise of cities, and the dawn of myth, markets, and money, it is a truly wonder-filled adventure.
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Samuel R. Delany including rare images from his early career.
    • Flight from Nevèrÿon by Samuel R. Delany

      Flight from Nevèrÿon

      Samuel R. Delany

      Two novellas and a full-length novel of Nevèrÿon, the land at the limit of history
      In The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals, a disease has come to Nevèrÿon. Men, rich and poor, have been stricken with it—but far fewer women. More and more die, and no one recovers. The illness seems to have first come from the Bridge of Lost Desire, a hangout for prostitutes male and female, but its spread through the city has been terrifying. And it will change Nevèrÿon forever, both its sexual and its political landscape.
      Written in 1984, The Tale of Plagues and Carnivals is an astute fictionalization of New York City in the first two years of the AIDS crisis. Interwoven with the ancient story are Samuel R. Delany’s modern accounts of what went on in the meanest streets of Gotham during that time.
      This wholly original novel (the first novel about AIDS from a major American publisher) is presented along with two other stories about mummers, prostitutes, and street people in the fantastic land of Nevèrÿon and its capital, port Kolhari—an ancient city that becomes more and more modern with each story.
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Samuel R. Delany including rare images from his early career.
    • Return to Nevèrÿon by Samuel R. Delany

      Return to Nevèrÿon

      Samuel R. Delany

      Slavery is outlawed, Nevèrÿon is free, and Gorgik the Liberator must revisit the mines for a final struggle where he himself was once a slave
      Alone in a deserted castle in the Nevèrÿon countryside, a great warrior and a young barbarian meet at midnight to tell each other tales from their intersecting lives. But are they really alone? And, if they aren’t, what will it mean for Nevèrÿon . . . ?
      The three stories in this volume end Samuel R. Delany’s Return to Nevèrÿon saga and cycle. But they are also its beginning—taking us back to the start of Gorgik’s epic—although, from what we’ve learned from the others, even that has become an entirely new story, though not a word in it has been changed . . .
      This ebook features an illustrated biography of Samuel R. Delany including rare images from his early career.
    • Venus Plus X by Theodore  Sturgeon

      Venus Plus X

      Theodore Sturgeon

      Theodore Sturgeon’s visionary tale sends a man into a utopian future, where perfection has been achieved at a shocking cost—especially for our ideas about gender
      Nothing about Charlie Johns’s life is particularly unusual until the day he wakes up in the future. Suddenly surrounded by impossible architecture and technology, Charlie finds himself warmly welcomed by the citizens of Ledom, a fantastic, futuristic Eden with no poverty, no pollution, no wars, no strife, and only one gender. Everything Charlie has always believed about men, women, and sexual identity has been proven wrong, and now he is being asked by his eager hosts to judge their perfect society before he returns to his own time. But something isn’t quite right about Ledom’s ideal existence—and when cracks begin to appear in its flawless façade, Charlie must unearth the city’s hidden secrets . . . before it’s too late. Sturgeon’s Venus Plus X is literary science fiction at its most brazen and inventive. A scathing critique of American puritanism that unabashedly explores questions of sexuality and gender, it remains as relevant, insightful, provocative, and troubling as when it first appeared in print. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Theodore Sturgeon including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the University of Kansas’s Kenneth Spencer Research Library and the author’s estate, among other sources.
    • Bloodchild by Octavia E. Butler

      Bloodchild

      Octavia E. Butler

      Six remarkable stories from a master of modern science fictionOctavia E. Butler’s classic “Bloodchild,” winner of both the Nebula and Hugo awards, anchors this collection of incomparable stories and essays. “Bloodchild” is set on a distant planet where human children spend their lives preparing to become hosts for the offspring of the alien Tlic. Sometimes the procedure is harmless, but often it is not. Also included is the Hugo Award–winning “Speech Sounds,” about a near future in which humans must adapt after an apocalyptic event robs them of their ability to speak. In these pages, Butler shows us life on Earth and amongst the stars, telling her tales with characteristic imagination and clarity. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Octavia E. Butler including rare images from the author’s estate.
    • Uncle Max by Chris Kenry

      Uncle Max

      Chris Kenry

      Meet fourteen-year-old Dillon: a self-described nerdy band fag in too-small clothes accessorized by a clarinet case and orthodontic headgear with a robin's egg-blue satin strap. Fresh from the rigors of junior high school gym class and daily torment by studly jock Aaron Lewis, Dillon is in desperate need of a three-month reprieve. Alas, that isn't to be-not after Dillon's mother, Lana, stumbles across his stash of empty wine bottles and Sears catalog pages featuring scantily clad male torsos. Unfortunately for Dillon, Lana has recently swapped booze and overflowing cleavage for fervent devotion to the one man who can never leave her, the Lord Jesus Christ, and His earthbound henchman, Wayne Blandings, assistant pastor at the Church of the Divine Redeemer. Alarmed at the diabolical evidence of Dillon's drunken, perverted nocturnal hobbies, Lana and Wayne conclude that Bible Camp is his only hope. Now on the verge of being shipped off to the Christian barracks, Dillon needs salvation of a different kind.

      Before you can say hallelujah, Dillon's personal savior materializes-fabulously shirtless and smoking a French cigarette. Perpetually on the lam, Uncle Max needs a place to hang-and hide-out for a while. But the flamboyant Francophile can't seem to elude a colorful mini-entourage that includes his parole officer, Meredith; his sexy mountaineer boyfriend, Serge; and fellow con artist and antiques dealer Jane Nguyen. Much to Dillon's amazement, loathsome Lana isn't all he has in common with the dashing family black sheep.

      Sprung from the proverbial closet at last, Dillon finds himself under Max's supervision for the summer. This entails Hitchcock films, Balzac novels, and a crash course in shoplifting, from which Dillon swiftly graduates to insurance fraud and art heists. Now, as Max and Jane's devoted sidekick, he's the third member of the notorious "Balzac Bunch," who specialize in befriending blue-haired, blue-blooded bridge players-and then relieving them of their priceless antiques.

      Too quickly, sultry July gives way to steamy August, and the heat is on in more ways than one. Now the cops are closing in, and only two things are certain: that autumn and Max's departure are imminent-and that for Dillon, nothing will ever be the same again.

       

       

    • Body Language by Michael Craft

      Body Language

      Michael Craft

      A midlife crisis sends Chicago Journal reporter Mark Manning back to his Wisconsin hometown—and into a morass of lust, lies, and lethal family secrets

      An unexpected windfall has given burned-out Chicago journalist Mark Manning the chance to reconnect with his boyhood roots. With the blessing of his lover, Neil, he leaves the Windy City to return to Dumont, Wisconsin, to take over the town paper. His long-awaited family reunion is cut short when his cousin Suzanne is bludgeoned to death just before Christmas dinner. Before she dies, she whispers something to Manning: the name of her son.

      Was she expressing a mother’s dying wish for the future welfare of her child? Or revealing the identity of her murderer? When Manning ends up in the local law’s sights, he’s suddenly racing against time to clear his own name and smoke out a killer. With no lack of suspects, from a troubled homophobe to a lesbian activist to a housekeeper, the clock is ticking on a story that could be the biggest of Manning’s career—if he lives long enough to write it.

      Body Language is the third book in Michael Craft’s Mark Manning series, which begins with Flight Dreams and Eye Contact.

    • Boy Toy by Michael Craft

      Journalist Mark Manning’s Midwestern hometown closes ranks against him when his nephew is suspected of murder

      For Mark Manning, running the local paper in his Wisconsin hometown is a refreshing change from his life as a hard-charging reporter for the Chicago Journal. Together with his partner, architect Neil Waite, he’s settling into scenic, sleepy Dumont, whose inhabitants have welcomed them into their fold.

      Until Manning’s nephew becomes the prime suspect in a murder case.

      Teenagers Thad Quatrain and Jason Thrush alternated the lead role in the community theatre’s production of Teen Play. Now Jason lies dead in his bedroom, the victim of mushroom poisoning. Amid rumors that Thad threatened to kill Jason, the town begins to turn against him. As a sweltering summer draws to an end, a shocking revelation has tempers seething—and threatening to boil over.

      A novel about sexual identity, desire, and the lies we tell ourselves, Boy Toy explores the secret passions that war within the human heart.

      Boy Toy is the fifth book in Michael Craft’s Mark Manning series, which begins with Flight Dreams and Eye Contact.

    • Eye Contact by Michael Craft

      Eye Contact

      Michael Craft

      Reporter Mark Manning searches for a killer and stumbles upon a stunning conspiracy

      Chicago Journal reporter Mark Manning has been called in to replace a colleague on a big story. Famed Swiss astrophysicist Pavo Zarnik has just stunned the science world with his announcement that he’s discovered a tenth planet in our solar system. Manning is skeptical of Zarnik’s claims and believes he’s a fraud. His suspicions grow when his fellow reporter—award-winning journalist Clifford Nolan—turns up dead, his laptop missing.

      Now, Manning is covering two breaking stories and coping with the not-entirely-unwanted advances of twenty-something reporter David Bosch. In a committed relationship with architect Neil Waite, Manning is determined to resist temptation. But he soon has bigger things to worry about. On the edge of a far-reaching political conspiracy, Manning matches wits with a killer whose agenda is about to become chillingly clear.

      Eye Contact is the second book in Michael Craft’s Mark Manning series, which also includes Flight Dreams and Body Language.

    • Flight Dreams by Michael Craft

      Flight Dreams

      Michael Craft

      A masterpiece of mystery and suspense, this is the moving story of a man struggling to come to terms with his sexuality

      Investigative journalist Mark Manning is on the trail of a story that could make his career. Airline heiress Helena Carter, who vanished seven years ago, is about to be declared legally dead. Her fortune, valued at over one hundred million dollars, will go to the Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago and the Federated Cat Clubs of America.

      Manning is the only one who believes that the missing Chicago socialite is still alive. And he’s just been given an ultimatum by his publisher: Prove it, or he’s history. Determined to keep his job—and hoping to secure the five-hundred-thousand-dollar reward from Carter’s estate, as well as the coveted Partridge Prize for investigative journalism—Manning enters a world of religious fanatics who could turn back the clock on gay rights. At the same time, Manning grapples with his own sexuality as he falls in love for the first time—with the man of his dreams.

      Flight Dreams is the first book in Michael Craft’s Mark Manning series, which continues with Eye Contact and Body Language.

    • Name Games by Michael Craft

      Name Games

      Michael Craft

      Journalist Mark Manning delves into the bizarre world of miniatures . . . and finds a king-sized case of murder

      Front-page news in the quiet town of Dumont, Wisconsin, where former Chicago reporter Mark Manning runs the town’s Daily Register, involves the annual exhibition of the Midwest Miniatures Society and new zoning laws for an adult bookstore. But murder becomes the headline when “King of Miniatures” Carrol Cantrell, the nation’s foremost expert, is found strangled in the guesthouse of a local shop owner.

      It seems Cantrell was leading a double life. He was having an affair with Doug Pierce, Dumont’s closeted sheriff and a good friend of Manning’s. With a blackmail note pointing to his guilt, Pierce soon becomes the prime suspect. Enlisting the help of colleagues, friends, and his lover, Neil, Manning races to clear Pierce’s name . . . and finds himself enmeshed in the seething rivalries and vicious back-stabbing that characterize the cutthroat worlds of miniatures and pornography. With suspects ranging from a gay-bashing feminist to a renowned French craftsman of miniatures, Manning unearths a hotbed of damning secrets someone has killed—and could kill again—to keep.

      Name Games is the fourth book in Michael Craft’s Mark Manning series, which begins with Flight Dreams and Eye Contact.

    • The Boy Who Was Buried This Morning by Joseph Hansen

      The Boy Who Was Buried This Morning

      Joseph Hansen

      When a paintball player gets hit with a real bullet, Dave Brandstetter catches the case

      Insurance investigator Dave Brandstetter has spent the last few years drifting in and out of retirement. For the sake of his boyfriend, Cecil, he has attempted to forgo dangerous jobs. But when a close friend’s death sends Dave into a depressive funk, Cecil recognizes that work is the only cure.

      During a high-stakes paintball game, a hardcore supremacist gets hit by a very real bullet. Although the police claim the death was accidental—nothing but a stray round from a nearby hunting preserve—Dave knows that a man this hated seldom dies by chance. His investigation takes him into the strange world of make-believe war—a grown-up version of cowboys and Indians whose players sometimes have trouble distinguishing fantasy from reality. If Dave isn’t careful, he’ll find himself stained with something more permanent than paint.

      The Boy Who Was Buried This Morning is book eleven in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes Troublemaker and The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of.

    • A Country of Old Men by Joseph Hansen

      A Country of Old Men

      Joseph Hansen

      For the sake of a frightened child, Dave Brandstetter takes on his very last case

      In his decades as an insurance investigator, Dave Brandstetter has never shied away from violence, and he’s had more than his share of close calls. Time is catching up with him, his body is slowing down, and his wit is not as sharp as it used to be. But he will forgo retirement once more for the sake of a puzzle no detective could resist.

      Walking on the beach, a friend finds a bedraggled child who claims he has witnessed a murder. The victim is a drug-addicted pop star, and the obvious suspect is the dead man’s ex-girlfriend—a junkie whom the child saw standing over the body, gun in hand. In the final installment of Joseph Hansen’s groundbreaking series, Dave looks for justice once more, hoping that he will also find a lasting measure of peace.

      A Country of Old Men is book twelve in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes Troublemaker and The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of.

    • Early Graves by Joseph Hansen

      Early Graves

      Joseph Hansen

      A vicious murderer is targeting gay men in Los Angeles, and it isn’t long before Dave Brandstetter finds himself in the killer’s path

      Dave Brandstetter’s afternoon does not begin well: His ex-boyfriend picks him up at the airport, and the ride home—in bumper-to-bumper Los Angeles traffic—is one long argument between them. The insurance investigator’s day gets worse when he finds a man—bloody, rain-soaked, and ice cold—lying on his porch, killed by a stab wound while Dave was out of town.

      There is a serial killer loose in Los Angeles, and this man is his sixth victim. Like the others, he had already been marked for death—by the unforgiving plague known as AIDS. Someone is targeting sick men in the city, and Dave’s search for the killer leads him into the dark side of gay Los Angeles, where death comes without warning, and life is a fearful dream.

      Early Graves is book nine in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes Troublemaker and The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of.

    • Gravedigger by Joseph Hansen

      Gravedigger

      Joseph Hansen

      A runaway girl leads Dave Brandstetter to confront a California sex cult

      Serenity ran away from home when her father was convicted of bribery. For two years, she drifted around the American Southwest, finally finding refuge in the arms of Azrael, a charismatic cult leader whose religion was founded upon blood. Long after Serenity’s disappearance, the police find a mass grave containing six dead girls on Azrael’s property. Thinking his daughter has been murdered, Serenity’s father claims her life insurance, and promptly disappears. Now it’s Dave Brandstetter’s problem.

      An insurance investigator with a keen eye and a skeptical mind, Dave is no stranger to savagery. But his trip to the high-priced suburbs of Los Angeles will teach him something new about the depths of human cruelty—and Azrael’s mass grave is only the beginning.

      Gravedigger is book six in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes Troublemaker and The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of.

    • The Little Dog Laughed by Joseph Hansen

      The Little Dog Laughed

      Joseph Hansen

      While investigating a suicide, Dave Brandstetter discovers a dead reporter’s final scoop

      Adam Streeter has covered international crises from Siberia to Cambodia. When disaster strikes, he grabs his battered typewriter and hops on a plane, hurling himself into danger wherever the story demands. He is brave, talented, and internationally renown—so why would he turn a pistol on himself?

      Insurance investigator Dave Brandstetter has seen enough suicides to know that a journalist this successful would never take his own life. Suspecting treachery, he digs into Adam’s last story—an unpublished investigation into the whereabouts of a vanished South American strongman, called El Carnicero,the Butcher—and Adam’s death shows every hallmark of his bloody style. To finish Adam’s investigation, Dave will have to make like a war correspondent and leap into the line of fire.

      The Little Dog Laughed is book eight in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes Troublemaker and The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of.

    • The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of by Joseph Hansen

      The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of

      Joseph Hansen

      In the small town of La Caleta, Dave Brandstetter investigates the murder of a very unpopular cop

      When Ben Orton’s head is found bludgeoned by a heavy flower pot, the people of La Caleta are stunned—not because their police chief has been murdered, but because no one thought to do it sooner. A bruising, violent man, Ben had a commitment to order that did not always take the law into account. But as insurance investigator Dave Brandstetter is about to find out, the corruption in Ben’s police force did not die with him.

      By the time Dave arrives in the fading fishing town, a young activist has already been arrested for the murder. Only Dave seems to care that the evidence against the accused is laughably thin. As the people of La Caleta try their best to thwart his investigation, Dave must do whatever it takes to catch Ben’s killer.

      The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of is book four in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes Troublemaker and Skinflick.

    • Nightwork by Joseph Hansen

      Nightwork

      Joseph Hansen

      In a neighborhood plagued with violence, Dave Brandstetter uncovers a corporate crime

      Gifford Gardens has gone to hell: Persistent flooding has reduced the neighborhood to a slum, a battleground for rival gangs. Anyone who can afford to leave has already pulled up stakes, and Paul and Angela Myers are among those who are left. To make ends meet, Paul takes on long-haul truck driving, which is as dangerous as it is lucrative, and it’s not long before the job gets him killed.

      One night, Paul’s truck flies off a cliff and explodes in midair. Did he fall asleep at the wheel, or was he murdered? Keen-eyed insurance investigator Dave Brandstetter suspects a conspiracy. While digging into Paul’s past, Dave will uncover a connection between his untimely death and the happier years of Gifford Gardens.

      Nightwork is book seven in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes Troublemaker and The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of.

    • Obedience by Joseph Hansen

      Obedience

      Joseph Hansen

      With retirement just out of reach, Dave Brandstetter investigates the killing of a Vietnamese immigrant

      As an insurance investigator, Dave Brandstetter has spent his life unraveling suspicious deaths. Now, well into middle age, he has decided to retire for the sake of Cecil, the young TV reporter who loves and cherishes him, and has too often risked his own life for Dave’s work. But retirement does not come easily.

      An old friend in the public defender’s office asks Dave to help Andy Flanagan, a shiftless young man accused of murdering a Vietnamese businessman to defend the Old Fleet—a shantytown of houseboats that has been earmarked for development. Unable to resist the case, Dave heads to the Old Fleet and begins asking questions. Beneath the surface of this oil-slicked slum lurks an international conspiracy so appalling that Dave will regret postponing his retirement.

      Obedience is book ten in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes Troublemaker and The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of.

    • Skinflick by Joseph Hansen

      Skinflick

      Joseph Hansen

      Now working freelance, Dave Brandstetter digs into an evangelist’s secret life

      His father’s death left Dave Brandstetter with a hole in his heart and an inheritance in his bank account. The money allowed him to venture out on his own, launching a freelance insurance investigation agency that specializes in suspicious deaths. His first case is potentially explosive, and if he isn’t careful, it could be his last.

      Crusading evangelist Gerald Dawson believes that piety and violence go hand-in-hand. To clean up his local skid row, he has taken to vigilante justice, ransacking pornography shops and intimidating their owners. When Gerald is found with his neck snapped, the police finger smut peddler Lon Tooker for the crime, but Dave disagrees. As he digs into the holy man’s nighttime activities, he finds a collection of sins that would make even the devil blush.

      Skinflick is book five in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes Troublemaker and The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of.

    • Troublemaker by Joseph Hansen

      Troublemaker

      Joseph Hansen

      Joseph Hansen’s groundbreaking investigator Dave Brandstetter delves into the suspicious death of a gay entrepreneur

      Rick Wendell’s ranch is far from town. A remote, dusty hideaway, its only inhabitants are Rick, his aging mother, and her horses. One night, Rick’s mother returns from the movies to find Rick lying on the floor, stark naked and with a gaping bullet wound in his chest. Standing over him is his lover, a mustachioed hippie, who swears he did not fire the gun that he’s holding. The case seems open-and-shut, but Dave Brandstetter is not satisfied.

      An insurance investigator with an unusually keen sense of detection, Dave is openly gay and professionally skeptical. Something about the murder causes him to trust the alleged killer—and seriously doubt Rick’s mother.

      Troublemaker is book three in the Dave Brandstetter Mystery series, which also includes The Man Everybody Was Afraid Of and Skinflick.

    • The Burning Plain by Michael Nava

      The Burning Plain

      Michael Nava

      Attorney Henry Rios fights for his freedom and his own life when a homophobic serial killer targets gay men in Los Angeles

      Defense attorney Henry Rios knows how the system can be weighted against you . . . especially if you’re gay. His worst nightmare becomes a reality when a man he had been on a date with the night before is slain. Relentlessly pursued by a homophobic Los Angeles Police Department cop, Rios goes from prime suspect to target when more gay men are savagely murdered. The victims all suffer the same fate: They’re beaten to death, with a hate message carved into their bodies, and they’re dumped in an alley.

      Rios must break through a conspiracy of silence that reaches to the highest levels of Los Angeles politics and Hollywood power. And the closer he gets to the truth, the closer he gets to becoming an enraged killer’s next victim.
      The Burning Plain
      is the sixth book in the Henry Rios mystery series, which begins with The Little Death and Goldenboy.
    • The Death of Friends by Michael Nava

      The Death of Friends

      Michael Nava

      When a judge leading a double life is murdered, Henry Rios comes to the controversial defense of the prime suspect

      Chris Chandler, a long-married and closeted California state superior court judge, has been found dead in his chambers—beaten to death with his recent Judge of the Year award. When his young lover, Zack Bowen, is arrested, Henry Rios takes on Bowen’s defense. For Rios, who has kept Judge Chandler’s secret since law school, it means going up against a closed community—including Chandler’s angry wife and son—to defend a man he believes innocent. Then Bowen vanishes.

      As Rios copes with the loss of a friend, and the impending death of his lover, Josh, he finds himself front and center in a case that becomes a test of his own moral courage.
      The Death of Friends
      is the fifth book in the Henry Rios mystery series, which begins with The Little Death and Goldenboy.
    • Goldenboy by Michael Nava

      Goldenboy

      Michael Nava

      In his latest case, Henry Rios may have something few defense attorneys ever experience: a truly innocent client

      It’s a cause Henry Rios can’t resist: defending a young gay man on trial for killing the coworker who threatened to out him. Jim Pears is charged with first-degree murder; Pears says he’s innocent but the evidence is damning. Pears was found covered in the victim’s blood and with the murder weapon in his hand. But nothing about the People v. Jim Pears is what it seems.

      Rios is asked to join the case because he knows first-hand the pressures and threats that come with being gay in 1980s California. In the midst of one of the most complex trials of his career, Rios meets and falls in love with Josh Mandel, the prosecutor’s star witness. For this defense attorney, fighting for justice has never been more personal. And the stakes are no less than life and death.

      Goldenboy
      is the second book in the Henry Rios mystery series, which also includes The Little Death and Howtown.
    • The Hidden Law by Michael Nava

      The Hidden Law

      Michael Nava

      The fourth novel in Michael Nava’s award-winning series takes Henry Rios back to his roots when he defends a Latino teenager accused of murder

      State senator and mayoral hopeful Gus Peña has been gunned down in the parking lot of a restaurant in East Los Angeles. When Chicano teen and ex–gang member Michael Ruiz is arrested for the murder, Henry Rios takes the case. It’s a tough road: As Rios endures a painful break-up with his HIV-positive partner, Josh, Ruiz refuses to help Rios in his defense. But Rios finds inconsistencies in the kid’s story, and is sure Ruiz is covering for the real killer.

      Peña had a lot of enemies. As Rios tries to build the case for a different killer, he descends into the dark underbelly of Los Angeles—a hotbed of vice and corruption. Caught between his powerful connection to both suspect and victim, Rios races to prevent a terrible failure of justice.

      The Hidden Law
      is the fourth book in the Henry Rios mystery series, which begins with The Little Death and Goldenboy.
    • Howtown by Michael Nava

      Howtown

      Michael Nava

      A controversial case brings lawyer Henry Rios back home to Oakland—and into the sights of a stone-cold killer

      It’s been almost a decade since Henry Rios has seen his sister, Elena. A troubled family history has left them both with unhappy memories. But his visit with his sister isn’t the reunion he imagined. As Rios comes to terms with the results of his partner’s HIV test, Elena asks him to defend Paul Windsor, someone they grew up with—who has a history of pedophilia and has just been charged with murder after his fingerprints were found at a crime scene.

      The victim, who peddled child pornography, was tortured before he was bludgeoned to death in a motel room. The investigation takes Rios back to his old neighborhood and down a twisting trail of blackmail, jealousy, and tainted love. Forced to confront his demons, he’ll face off with some hard truths about himself—and with a merciless killer.

      Howtown
      is the third book in the Henry Rios mystery series, which also includes The Little Death and Goldenboy.
    • The Little Death by Michael Nava

      The Little Death

      Michael Nava

      In the first book of the acclaimed Henry Rios series, a lawyer doggedly pursues a murder investigation into the lions’ den of San Francisco’s moneyed elite

      A burnt-out public defender battling alcoholism, Henry Rios has reached a crossroads in his life. While interviewing his former lover Hugh Paris in jail, Rios goes through the motions, but notices that Paris is far more polished and well off than the usual suspects arrested for drug possession. Paris is mysteriously bailed out—but a few weeks later, he turns up on Rios’s doorstep. Skittish and paranoid, he admits to using heroin and says he’s afraid that his wealthy grandfather wants to murder him.

      Rios tries to help Paris get clean, but when Paris is found dead of an apparent heroin overdose, Rios is the only one who considers foul play. Determined to find Paris’s killer, Rios knocks on San Francisco’s most gilded doors, where he discovers a family tainted by jealousy, greed, and hate. They’ve been warped by a fortune someone’s willing to kill—and kill again—to possess.

      At once an atmospheric noir mystery and a scathing indictment of a legal system caught in the maws of escalating corruption, The Little Death chronicles one man’s struggle to achieve true justice for all.

      The Little Death
      is the first book in the Henry Rios mystery series, which also includes Goldenboy and Howtown.
    • Rag and Bone by Michael Nava

      Rag and Bone

      Michael Nava

      In Michael Nava’s final Henry Rios mystery, the gay Latino lawyer faces his most daunting personal and professional challenges as he comes to terms with his past—and a cache of family secrets

      Henry Rios was dead for fifty-seven seconds when he suffered a heart attack in the courtroom. While he recovers, his sister, Elena, stays with him at the hospital, and they begin to repair their strained relationship, finally airing their thoughts and regrets about their childhood in an abusive home. But Elena has an extra surprise for Rios: Thirty years ago, when she was in college, she had a baby and gave her up for adoption. The girl, Vicky, grew up in foster homes, but now seeks out Elena for help escaping an abusive husband.

      Despite Elena and Rios’s efforts, Vicky returns to her husband—but not long after, he’s shot dead in a motel room and Vicky claims to have blown him away. Rios doesn’t believe her confession, though, and finds evidence that suggests she’s innocent. Rios’s search for the facts leads him into a thicket of secrets and lies. As he fights for a niece he never knew he had, he must also combat the ever-present shadow of his own mortality and the truth about his past. A possible judgeship and the beginning of a new love give him hope for the future in this stellar conclusion to the acclaimed Henry Rios series, about love, loss, and the enduring power of family.

      Rag and Bone
      is the seventh book in the Henry Rios mystery series, which begins with The Little Death and Goldenboy.
    • Murder in the Collective by Barbara Wilson

      Murder in the Collective

      Barbara Wilson

      Seattle printing collective owner Pam Nilsen is on the case when a member of the group turns up dead before a controversial merger
      Pam Nilsen and her twin sister, Penny, inherited Best Printing four years ago when their parents died in a car crash. Unwilling to sell their family legacy, the sisters turned it into a collective run by a cadre of activists whose arguments over the business can be just as impassioned as their support for progressive causes. But internal divisions at the collective pale in comparison to those between Seattle typesetters B. Violet and Moby Dick—once a single company that has since broken apart into an all-female (and lesbian-run) company, and an all-male (and quickly bankrupt) operation.
      Shortly after Best Printing and B. Violet begin discussing a merger, the offices of the typesetter are ransacked, one of their members nowhere to be found. Then an employee of Best Printing is found murdered. It appears as if someone will stop at nothing—not even murder—to prevent the merger. And it’s up to Pam to get to the bottom of this deadly turn of events before the killer strikes again.
      Murder in the Collective
      is the first book in the Pam Nilsen Mystery trilogy, which continues with Sisters of the Road and The Dog Collar Murders.
    • Sisters of the Road by Barbara Wilson

      Sisters of the Road

      Barbara Wilson

      When a teenage runaway is murdered and her best friend goes missing, Pam Nilsen must dig into the seedy underbellies of Seattle and Portland to discover the truth
      Pam Nilsen, co-owner of Seattle collective Best Printing, is still recovering from the heartbreak of her first real girlfriend leaving town when she decides to take two young prostitutes under her wing. The girls, age fourteen, are already coarsened by the worlds of sex, drugs, and crime. When one turns up dead and the other, Trish, is nowhere to be found, Pam hits the streets to find her. Trish, a possible witness to murder, is in danger, but for a runaway child of the night, help is in short supply. Pam is Trish’s only hope—not just for her immediate survival, but for escaping the streets before they can devour her.
      Sisters of the Road
      is the second book in the Pam Nilsen Mystery trilogy, which begins with Murder in the Collective and concludes with The Dog Collar Murders.